Pierce, Duncan

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Pierce, Duncan

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Pierce, Duncan

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Pierce, Duncan : NE 6-29-21-W2

This file part consists of federal Department of the Interior records related to homestead applications, land grants (letters patent), and/or land use enquiries that are associated with the person or organization (e.g. grantee, patentee) and (where identified) the land location specified in the title of the record description.

Canada. Dept. of the Interior

Pierce, Duncan : W 14-09-01-W2

This File part consists of federal Department of the Interior records related to homestead applications, land grants (letters patent), and/or land use enquiries that are associated with the person or organization (e.g. grantee, patentee) and the land location specified in the title of the record description.

Canada. Dept. of the Interior

The Fragrant Wind

The Fragrant Wind, the unpublished recollections of Cannington Manor compiled by Phyllis Pierce Walsh, granddaughter of Captain Edward M. Pierce.

Includes references to various individuals as follows: Henry Cameron, an Indian interpreter at Crooked Lake Reserve; Spencer Page and his brother, George Shaw Page, who came to Cannington Manor to study farming methods under Captain Pierce. George Shaw Page married Lily Pierce; Lily, Jessie and Frances Pierce, daughters of Edward M. Pierce; George Norman Pierce, cousin of Edward M. Pierce; and Isabella Pierce (nee Dodd), eldest child of Dr. Henry Dodd and wife of Duncan Pierce; Reverend John Shelley, an Anglican priest and rector of All Saints, Cannington Manor (pgs. 96-98); Duncan Pierce, son of Captain Edward M. Pierce; Father Albert Lacombe, a Roman Catholic missionary who worked among the Indians (pg. 218). Includes history of the Pierce family in England (Devon) and on the Continent (pgs. 118-131).

Includes references to playing tennis on the courts at Cannington Manor (pg. 77). Pages 152 to 175 include references to Northwest Angle Treaty. Includes references to confrontation between Captain Pierce and Chief White Bear ( pgs. 59 to 64 and 95 to 96). Includes references to the breeding of race horses for running at the Cannington Manor Turf Club (pages 50-52, 54). Includes references to Bob Bird, an early settler at Cannington Manor (pg. 45). Includes references to the Beckton brothers, wheat and stock farmers who lived at Cannington Manor, built the Didsbury house and stables and were noted for their race horses (pages 48-50). Includes reference to the hunt club (fox hunting) at Cannington Manor (pages 42-43). Includes references to the French counts of St. Hubert, The Counts Roffignac and Jumellac who lived at St. Hubert's Mission. Also references to Baron de Brabant, farming, manufacturing and recreation (pages 53-56). Includes references to the colony of the French counts (St. Hubert's Mission) (pages 53-54). Includes references to the building of All Saints Anglican Church, Cannington Manor (pgs. 73-75).

Includes the experiences of Duncan Pierce, Indian agent, and his family on the Crooked Lake Indian Reserve. Duncan Pierce was the son of Captain E.M. Pierce, founder of Cannington Manor (see pgs. 134-228). Includes references to Indian celebrations at Cannington Manor (pgs. 54-58). Includes references to the Indian legend regarding how the name "Qu'Appelle" came about (pgs. 241-243). Includes references to Chief White Bear (Wah-pee-makwa) and the unrest among the Indians around Cannington Manor ca. 1883 including a confrontation between Captain Pierce and Chief White Bear (pgs. 59-64, 95-96). Includes references to Sha-Wah-Kal-Koose, son of Chief White Bear, and a meeting between White Bear's son and Captain Pierce (pgs. 67-69).