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Registro de autoridad
Local Government

Goodwater (Sask.), 1911-

  • LGA 39
  • Local Government
  • 1911-

The Village of Goodwater is an urban municipality incorporated on May 8, 1911. At the first meeting of the village council on August 7, 1911, councilors were William Hobbs, Edward McIntyre, and James Seeley, with S.A. Davidson appointed as secretary-treasurer and Hobbs as overseer.

The village is governed by an elected council that can hire staff to manage daily administration and maintain municipal services, such as roads, utilities and recreation facilities. The responsibilities of the council include enforcing bylaws; waste collection/landfill; fire protection; maintaining public utilities, roads and streets; issuing tax and assessment notices and collecting taxes and other fees.

The Village of Goodwater was named for its proximity to a good source of water for steam engines that ran along the nearby railroad. Goodwater is an agricultural and oil industry based community located at 21-5-13-W2 in southeastern Saskatchewan, approximately 160 kilometers southeast of Regina. The town is situated in Lomond Rural Municipality No. 37.

The village is currently (2009) governed by mayor and two councilors, each elected to three-year terms. The general administration of the village is handled by a village administrator. The population was 25 in 2006.

Leader (Sask.), 1917-

  • LGA 38
  • Local Government
  • 1917-

The Town of Prussia was an urban municipality incorporated on May 1, 1917. The name of the town was changed to Leader on November 1, 1917. Leader is an agricultural based community located thirty kilometres east of the Saskatchewan / Alberta border in southwestern Saskatchewan. It is located on NE21-22-26-W3 in Happyland Rural Municipality No. 231.

The town is governed by an elected council that can hire staff to manage daily administration and maintain municipal services, such as roads, utilities and recreation facilities. The responsibilities of the council include enforcing bylaws; waste collection/landfill; fire protection; maintaining public utilities, roads and streets; issuing tax and assessment notices and collecting taxes and other fees.

The town is currently (2007) administered by a mayor, six councilors and an administrator. Councilors sit on various committees, as follows: General Government Services; Protective Services; Transportation Services; Environmental Health and Development; Recreation and Cultural Services and Utilities.

Regina Beach (Sask.), 1920-1980

  • LGA 37
  • Local Government
  • 1920-1980

The Village of Regina Beach, Saskatchewan was an urban municipality incorporated on September 30, 1920. The village was located 58 kilometres north west of Regina, near the south west end of Last Mountain Lake in Lumsden Rural Municipality No. 189. The site, originally knows as Cain's Point, has served as a popular vacation spot since the late 1800's. The site was accessible by both rail and steamboat. By 1910, property was being sold, summer homes were being built and a village began to take shape. Dr. and Mrs. David Low of Regina are credited with being the first couple to build at Cain's Point, and Mrs. Low is said to have renamed the site Regina Beach.

The village was governed by an elected council that could hire staff to manage daily administration and maintain municipal services, such as roads, utilities and recreation facilities. The responsibilities of the council include enforcing bylaws; waste management; fire protection; maintaining public utilities, roads and streets; issuing tax and assessment notices, and collecting taxes and other fees.

The Village of Regina Beach was governed originally by an overseer, councilors, and a secretary-treasurer. Around 1970 the governance structure changed to include a mayor (formerly the overseer), councilors, and a secretary-treasurer.

The Village of Regina Beach was incorporated as the Town of Regina Beach on November 1, 1980 and there is a current (2009) population of 1, 125.

Assiniboia (Sask.), 1913-

  • LGA 36
  • Local Government
  • 1913-

The Town of Assiniboia is an urban municipality in Saskatchewan and was incorporated on October 1, 1913. In 1912, the site where the town now stands was appointed as a Canadian Pacific Railway divisional site and lots were sold immediately. In 1913, a school was built, and within one year, Assiniboia had a rural telephone company, daily mail service and a hospital. Assiniboia is located on the Canadian Pacific Railway Weyburn-Lethbridge line, 105 kilometres south of Moose Jaw in the Lake of the Rivers Rural Municipality No.72.

The town is governed by an elected council that can hire staff to manage daily administration and maintain municipal services such as roads, utilities and recreational facilities. The responsibilities of the council include enforcing bylaws; waste collection/landfill; fire protection; maintaining public utilities, roads and streets; issuing tax assessment notices; and collecting taxes and other fees.

The town is currently (2009) administered by a mayor, six councillors, and an administrator. The current population is 2, 305 people.

Casavant School District No. 3127, 1913-1973

  • LGA 35
  • Local Government
  • 1913-1973

In July 1913, a committee of ratepayers in the Vonda, Saskatchewan district petitioned the Department of Education for the formation of a school district. At a meeting held by the committee on August 11, 1913, 10 resident ratepayers voted in favor of the district; none was opposed. The trustees elected were Clotere Denis, Emile Casavant and W. Richard.

Casavant School District No. 3127 was officially established on September 22, 1913 in accordance with the provisions of the Schools Act. The responsibilities of the district board included selecting and acquiring a school site; contracting the building of the school; furnishing and maintaining the school and grounds, buildings and equipment; hiring qualified teachers; providing books, globes, maps and other supplies to students and teachers; administering grants; settling disputes and maintaining school records and accounts.

In December 1913, the Board of Trustees borrowed $1800 to build and furnish a school house with a teachers' residence. The one room schoolhouse was located at NW 23-37-1-W3.

The duties and powers of the district board were revised when Casavant School District joined the Wakaw School Unit No. 48 in 1952. The rural school was closed in June, 1961. On September 1, 1961, Casavant School District was transferred to the Saskatoon (East) School Unit No. 41. Casavant and Dinelle's School District No. 1176 were consolidated to form the Casavant Central School Board, which administered a centralized school located in the hamlet of St. Denis.

On July 24, 1973, Casavant School District was disestablished and the lands from the Casavant district were consolidated with Vonda School District No. 1312 and Vonda Roman Catholic Separate School District No. 18.

Rural Municipality of Invergordon No. 430, 1911-

  • LGA 34
  • Local Government
  • 1911-

On June 16, 1911 a municipal committee of five members petitioned the Minister of Municipal Affairs for authority to proceed with the organization of a rural municipality in the area in townships 43, 44, 45a and 45 in range 22 and townships 43, 44 and 45 in ranges 23 and 24, west of the second meridian. The area consisted of 326 square miles with a population of 372. The Minister of Municipal Affairs granted approval and the Rural Municipality of Invergordon No. 430 was incorporated on December 11, 1911 pursuant to the Municipalities Act. The first municipal council consisted of reeve David Sutherland and six councillors. The first secretary-treasurer was W.E. Brock. The rural municipality, located approximately 50 kilometres southeast of Prince Albert, encompasses the communities of Crystal Springs, Tway, Meskanaw and Yellow Creek.

The municipal office is located in Crystal Springs. The rural municipality is responsible for providing public utilities and services, such as water, sewage disposal, heat, electrical power and waste management. It is also responsible for preparing assessment rolls and financial statements; collecting taxes; maintaining roads; preventing cruelty to animals and passing and enforcing by-laws. The municipality is currently (2009) administered by a reeve, six councillors and an administrator. The Council meeting is held on the second Wednesday of the month. The current population is 570.

Rural Municipality of Laird No. 404, 1910-

  • LGA 33
  • Local Government
  • 1910-

The Rural Municipality of Laird No. 404 of Saskatchewan was incorporated on December 12, 1910 pursuant to the Rural Municipalities Act (S.S. 1908-09, c.6). The first reeve elected was C. Unruh. The first councillors were D. Peters, J.D. Neufeldt, J.B. Peters, A.P. Dickman, J.J. Gossen and J.J. Janzen. The first secretary-treasurer was John A. Funk. The municipality, located north of Saskatoon, encompasses the town of Waldheim and the village of Hepburn. It serves the area located in ranges 5, 6 and 7, west of the third meridian, townships 40 to 44. The North Saskatchewan River runs through the municipality, which was possibly named after David Laird, the first Lieutenant Governor of the North-West Territories.

The municipal office is located in Waldheim. The municipality is currently (2009) administered by a reeve, six councillors and an administrator, previously known as the secretary-treasurer. Their responsibilities include passing by-laws, maintaining cemeteries, collecting taxes, assisting in maintaining hospitals and roads and preventing cruelty to animals. The Council meets once per month.

The population in the rural municipality has remained relatively stable. In 1927, there were 2848 residents. The population remained strong into the 1950s, when a slight decline occurred. The population as of 2009 is 1136.

Dundurn (Sask.), 1905-1980

  • LGA 32
  • Local Government
  • 1905-1980

The Village of Dundurn was an urban municipality incorporated on July 7, 1905 under the provisions of The Village Ordinance. The first overseer, John Burkitt, was elected on July 17, 1905. F.E. Livingstone was the first secretary-treasurer. The responsibilities of the elected council, consisting of an overseer and three councillors, included enforcing bylaws; waste collection/landfill; fire protection; maintaining public utilities, roads and streets; issuing tax and assessment notices and collecting taxes and other fees. The secretary-treasurer performed administrative duties.

The Village of Dundurn, named for Dundurn Castle in Scotland, was an agricultural based community located on section 9 in township 33, range 4, west of the third meridian in central Saskatchewan. It was situated approximately 30 kilometers southeast of the City of Saskatoon on Highway No. 11 and was situated in Dundurn Rural Municipality No. 314.

In 1979, Dundurn had a population of 409 and was governed by a mayor and three councillors. Dundurn was incorporated as a town on November 1, 1980.

Eastend (Sask.), 1920-

  • LGA 31
  • Local Government
  • 1920-

Eastend is an urban municipality originally incorporated as a village on February 26, 1914. Eastend was incorporated as a town on March 15, 1920 under the provisions of The Village Act. The first municipal officials, elected on March 29, 1920, were W.T. Bickerton (overseer) and A.H. Stevens, W.P. Anderson, Ed Youngberg, W. Miller and J. Peterson (councillors).

The town is governed by an elected council that can hire staff to manage daily administration and maintain municipal services, such as roads, utilities and recreation facilities. The responsibilities of the council include enforcing bylaws; waste collection/landfill; fire protection; maintaining public utilities, roads and streets; issuing tax and assessment notices and collecting taxes and other fees.

Eastend is an agricultural based community located on section 31, township 6, range 21, west of the third meridian in southwestern Saskatchewan, about 33 kilometers southwest of the town of Shaunavon in the Frenchman River Valley. It is located on Highway 13 between Shaunavon and Robsart and situated within White Valley Rural Municipality No. 49.

The name Eastend is derived from the North West Mounted Police (NWMP) East End post established on the eastern slopes of the Cypress Hills in 1879. When the NWMP detachment moved a few years later to a site adjacent the Frenchman River (the current town site) the name remained.

The town currently (2006) covers 2.71 square kilometers and has a population of 576. The town council meets twice monthly and consists of a mayor, six councillors and an administrator.

Creelman (Sask.), 1906-

  • LGA 30
  • Local Government
  • 1906-

The Village of Creelman is an urban municipality incorporated on April 6, 1906 under the provisions of The Village Ordinance. The village is governed by an elected council that can hire staff to manage daily administration and maintain municipal services, such as roads, utilities and recreation facilities. The responsibilities of the council include enforcing bylaws; waste collection/landfill; fire protection; maintaining public utilities, roads and streets; issuing tax and assessment notices and collecting taxes and other fees. The village was originally administered by an overseer, councillors, and a secretary-treasurer.

The Village of Creelman is an agricultural based community located on the west half of section 16, township 10, range 10, west of the second meridian, 90 kilometers northwest of the City of Weyburn in the southeast corner of Saskatchewan. The village straddles Highway 33 between Fillmore and Heward and is located within Fillmore Rural Municipality No. 96. Although homesteaders in the area originally named the village Hazel, the Canadian Pacific Railway changed the name in 1904 to Creelman in honour of A. Robert Creelman, a solicitor for the railway at the time.

In 2005, the village covered an area of 1.15 square kilometers and had a population of 85. The village's municipal officials included a mayor, four councillors and an administrator.

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