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Local Government

Whitewood (Sask.), 1892-

  • LGA 26
  • Local Government
  • 1892-

The Town of Whitewood is an urban municipality incorporated on December 31, 1892 under the provisions of An Ordinance to Incorporate the Town of Whitewood (No. 34 of 1892). The first municipal officials, elected on January 30, 1893 included James Grierson (mayor), four councilors and John Hawkes (town clerk).The town is governed by an elected council that can hire staff to manage daily administration and maintain municipal services, such as roads, utilities and recreation facilities. The responsibilities of the council include enforcing bylaws; waste collection/landfill; fire protection; maintaining public utilities, roads and streets; issuing tax and assessment notices and collecting taxes and other fees.

The Town of Whitewood, named for the clumps of white poplars in the area, is an agricultural based community located at 7-16-2-W2 in southeastern Saskatchewan, approximately 175 kilometers east of Regina. The town is often referred to as Crossroad Country as it is intersected by two major highways, the Trans Canada and Highway No. 9. The town is situated in Willowdale Rural Municipality No. 153.

The town is currently (2006) governed by a mayor and six councilors, each elected to three year terms. Subcommittees of Council manage public services, community economic development and recreation. The general administration of the town is handled by an administrator and an office clerk. The current population is 947.

Rural Municipality of Lomond No. 37, 1911-

  • LGA 27
  • Local Government
  • 1911-

The Rural Municipality of Lomond No. 37 is a rural municipality (RM) in Saskatchewan incorporated on December 11, 1911 under The Rural Municipality Act (S.S. 1908-09, c.6). The R.M. of Lomond, located just south of the City of Weyburn, encompasses the Village of Goodwater and the Hamlet of Colgate. It serves the area located in ranges 12 to 16, west of the second meridian, townships 3 to 7. The municipality was named after Loch Lomond in Scotland.

The municipal office is located in Goodwater. The municipality is currently (2009) administered by a reeve, six councilors and an administrator, previously known as the secretary-treasurer. Their responsibilities include passing by-laws, collecting taxes, and maintaining roads and cemeteries.

Liberty (Sask.), 1912-

  • LGA 28
  • Local Government
  • 1912-

The Village of Liberty is an urban municipality incorporated on January 23, 1912 under the provisions of The Village Act. The village is governed by an elected council that can hire staff to manage daily administration and maintain municipal services, such as roads, utilities and recreation facilities. The responsibilities of the council include enforcing bylaws; waste collection/landfill; fire protection; maintaining public utilities, roads and streets; issuing tax and assessment notices and collecting taxes and other fees.

The Village of Liberty is located on section 21, township 25, range 25, west of the second meridian in central Saskatchewan, 105 kilometres north of the City of Moose Jaw. Liberty is located on Highway 2 between Imperial and Penzance. It is situated in Big Arm Rural Municipality No. 251. It is believed that the name of the village was selected by a Canadian Pacific Railway surveyor in recognition of settler B.A. (Ben) Wolff, who was originally from Liberty, New York, and who had exhibited great hospitality toward the survey crew during the winter of 1906-1907.

The first village office was built in October, 1913 and served for many years as a pump house, fire hall, jail and council chambers. In 1978, the former Masonic Temple building was converted into the new village office.

The Village of Liberty has a current (2006) population of 94. Liberty's municipal officials currently include a mayor, two councillors, and an administrator, who prior to 1985 was known as the secretary-treasurer.

Dundurn (Sask.), 1980-

  • LGA 29
  • Local Government
  • 1980-

The Town of Dundurn is an urban municipality incorporated on November 1, 1980. Dundurn was originally incorporated as a village on July 7, 1905 and retained that status until 1980. The town is governed by an elected council that can hire staff to manage daily administration and maintain municipal services, such as roads, utilities and recreation facilities. The responsibilities of the council include enforcing bylaws; waste collection/landfill; fire protection; maintaining public utilities, roads and streets; issuing tax and assessment notices and collecting taxes and other fees.

The Town of Dundurn, named for Dundurn Castle in Scotland, is an agricultural based community located in central Saskatchewan. It is situated approximately 30 kilometers south of the City of Saskatoon on Highway No. 11 and is located in Dundurn Rural Municipality No. 314.

The town is currently (2006) administered by a mayor, five councillors, a treasurer and an administrator. The current population is 596.

Trosley School District No. 4553, 1924-1944

  • LGA 3
  • Local Government
  • 1924-1944

On January 23, 1924, eleven resident ratepayers in the Eyre, Saskatchewan district met and voted in favour of the establishment of a school district. The first trustees elected were Samuel G. Smitherman, R.E. Tomlinson and A.J. Douglas, who was named secretary-treasurer. The Trosley School District No. 4553 was officially established on February 6, 1924.

The responsibilities of the Trosley school board included selecting and acquiring a school site and contracting the building of a school house; furnishing and maintaining the school, school grounds, buildings and equipment; engaging qualified teachers; providing books, globes, maps and other supplies to teachers and students; administering grants; settling disputes and maintaining school records and accounts.

A one room school, located at NW 9-25-28-W3, was opened in September, 1924 with seventeen enrolled students. Edith C. Rowles was the first teacher. The school was closed in June, 1942 due to the small student population. The duties and powers of the school board were revised when Trosley School District No. 4553 became part of the Kindersley School Unit No. 34 on January 1, 1945.

Creelman (Sask.), 1906-

  • LGA 30
  • Local Government
  • 1906-

The Village of Creelman is an urban municipality incorporated on April 6, 1906 under the provisions of The Village Ordinance. The village is governed by an elected council that can hire staff to manage daily administration and maintain municipal services, such as roads, utilities and recreation facilities. The responsibilities of the council include enforcing bylaws; waste collection/landfill; fire protection; maintaining public utilities, roads and streets; issuing tax and assessment notices and collecting taxes and other fees. The village was originally administered by an overseer, councillors, and a secretary-treasurer.

The Village of Creelman is an agricultural based community located on the west half of section 16, township 10, range 10, west of the second meridian, 90 kilometers northwest of the City of Weyburn in the southeast corner of Saskatchewan. The village straddles Highway 33 between Fillmore and Heward and is located within Fillmore Rural Municipality No. 96. Although homesteaders in the area originally named the village Hazel, the Canadian Pacific Railway changed the name in 1904 to Creelman in honour of A. Robert Creelman, a solicitor for the railway at the time.

In 2005, the village covered an area of 1.15 square kilometers and had a population of 85. The village's municipal officials included a mayor, four councillors and an administrator.

Eastend (Sask.), 1920-

  • LGA 31
  • Local Government
  • 1920-

Eastend is an urban municipality originally incorporated as a village on February 26, 1914. Eastend was incorporated as a town on March 15, 1920 under the provisions of The Village Act. The first municipal officials, elected on March 29, 1920, were W.T. Bickerton (overseer) and A.H. Stevens, W.P. Anderson, Ed Youngberg, W. Miller and J. Peterson (councillors).

The town is governed by an elected council that can hire staff to manage daily administration and maintain municipal services, such as roads, utilities and recreation facilities. The responsibilities of the council include enforcing bylaws; waste collection/landfill; fire protection; maintaining public utilities, roads and streets; issuing tax and assessment notices and collecting taxes and other fees.

Eastend is an agricultural based community located on section 31, township 6, range 21, west of the third meridian in southwestern Saskatchewan, about 33 kilometers southwest of the town of Shaunavon in the Frenchman River Valley. It is located on Highway 13 between Shaunavon and Robsart and situated within White Valley Rural Municipality No. 49.

The name Eastend is derived from the North West Mounted Police (NWMP) East End post established on the eastern slopes of the Cypress Hills in 1879. When the NWMP detachment moved a few years later to a site adjacent the Frenchman River (the current town site) the name remained.

The town currently (2006) covers 2.71 square kilometers and has a population of 576. The town council meets twice monthly and consists of a mayor, six councillors and an administrator.

Dundurn (Sask.), 1905-1980

  • LGA 32
  • Local Government
  • 1905-1980

The Village of Dundurn was an urban municipality incorporated on July 7, 1905 under the provisions of The Village Ordinance. The first overseer, John Burkitt, was elected on July 17, 1905. F.E. Livingstone was the first secretary-treasurer. The responsibilities of the elected council, consisting of an overseer and three councillors, included enforcing bylaws; waste collection/landfill; fire protection; maintaining public utilities, roads and streets; issuing tax and assessment notices and collecting taxes and other fees. The secretary-treasurer performed administrative duties.

The Village of Dundurn, named for Dundurn Castle in Scotland, was an agricultural based community located on section 9 in township 33, range 4, west of the third meridian in central Saskatchewan. It was situated approximately 30 kilometers southeast of the City of Saskatoon on Highway No. 11 and was situated in Dundurn Rural Municipality No. 314.

In 1979, Dundurn had a population of 409 and was governed by a mayor and three councillors. Dundurn was incorporated as a town on November 1, 1980.

Rural Municipality of Laird No. 404, 1910-

  • LGA 33
  • Local Government
  • 1910-

The Rural Municipality of Laird No. 404 of Saskatchewan was incorporated on December 12, 1910 pursuant to the Rural Municipalities Act (S.S. 1908-09, c.6). The first reeve elected was C. Unruh. The first councillors were D. Peters, J.D. Neufeldt, J.B. Peters, A.P. Dickman, J.J. Gossen and J.J. Janzen. The first secretary-treasurer was John A. Funk. The municipality, located north of Saskatoon, encompasses the town of Waldheim and the village of Hepburn. It serves the area located in ranges 5, 6 and 7, west of the third meridian, townships 40 to 44. The North Saskatchewan River runs through the municipality, which was possibly named after David Laird, the first Lieutenant Governor of the North-West Territories.

The municipal office is located in Waldheim. The municipality is currently (2009) administered by a reeve, six councillors and an administrator, previously known as the secretary-treasurer. Their responsibilities include passing by-laws, maintaining cemeteries, collecting taxes, assisting in maintaining hospitals and roads and preventing cruelty to animals. The Council meets once per month.

The population in the rural municipality has remained relatively stable. In 1927, there were 2848 residents. The population remained strong into the 1950s, when a slight decline occurred. The population as of 2009 is 1136.

Rural Municipality of Invergordon No. 430, 1911-

  • LGA 34
  • Local Government
  • 1911-

On June 16, 1911 a municipal committee of five members petitioned the Minister of Municipal Affairs for authority to proceed with the organization of a rural municipality in the area in townships 43, 44, 45a and 45 in range 22 and townships 43, 44 and 45 in ranges 23 and 24, west of the second meridian. The area consisted of 326 square miles with a population of 372. The Minister of Municipal Affairs granted approval and the Rural Municipality of Invergordon No. 430 was incorporated on December 11, 1911 pursuant to the Municipalities Act. The first municipal council consisted of reeve David Sutherland and six councillors. The first secretary-treasurer was W.E. Brock. The rural municipality, located approximately 50 kilometres southeast of Prince Albert, encompasses the communities of Crystal Springs, Tway, Meskanaw and Yellow Creek.

The municipal office is located in Crystal Springs. The rural municipality is responsible for providing public utilities and services, such as water, sewage disposal, heat, electrical power and waste management. It is also responsible for preparing assessment rolls and financial statements; collecting taxes; maintaining roads; preventing cruelty to animals and passing and enforcing by-laws. The municipality is currently (2009) administered by a reeve, six councillors and an administrator. The Council meeting is held on the second Wednesday of the month. The current population is 570.

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