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Local Government

Truax (Sask.), 1912-1970

  • LGA 43
  • Local Government
  • 1912-1970

The Village of Truax, Saskatchewan was an urban municipality incorporated on September 9, 1912. The town was originally to have been named Schuett after Joseph Schuett, one of the first homesteaders in the district, but was named Truax, after Reuben Truax of Ontario, a close friend of Martin Schuett Sr. The Village of Truax was located on the Canadian National Railway line between Moose Jaw and Radville.

The village was governed by an elected council that could hire staff to manage daily administration and maintain municipal services, such as roads, utilities and recreation facilities. The responsibilities of the council included enforcing bylaws; waste management; fire protection; maintaining public utilities, roads and streets; issuing tax and assessment notices, and collecting taxes and other fees.

The Village of Truax was governed originally by an overseer, councilors, and a secretary-treasurer. Later, the governance structure of Saskatchewan villages changed to include a mayor (formerly the overseer), councilors and a secretary-treasurer. In Truax, the first overseer was F.A. Bennett, and the first secretary-treasurer was Joseph Duck. In February 1923, a fire consumed the Municipal Office building in Truax, destroying many of the records for the village.

On December 31, 1970, the Village of Truax reverted to a hamlet and sometime before 2002 the hamlet was dissolved. The residents of the community came under the jurisdiction of Elmsthorpe Rural Municipality No. 100.

Outlook School Unit No. 32, 1945-1978

  • LGA 46
  • Local Government
  • 1945-1978

Outlook School Unit No. 32 of Saskatchewan was established on August 27, 1945 pursuant to The Larger School Units Act (SS 1944, c.41). The Unit originally consisted of 106 rural and village public school districts, which were arranged in five subunits. On September 22, 1945, the Board of the Unit assumed office and took over the assets and liabilities of the school districts under its control. The Board was elected and consisted of five members (one for each of the subunits) who served two year terms. The Unit office was located in the town of Outlook, which is located approximately 90 kilometres southwest of Saskatoon.

The Board of the Outlook School Unit No. 32 was responsible for administering and managing each school district in the unit and for generally supervising and controlling each school. The Board provided buildings, equipment and supplies; hired qualified teachers; paid teachers their monthly salaries; and dealt with attendance, transportation and disciplinary issues. The Board was assisted by a secretary-treasurer, who managed the finances and kept minutes of Board meetings. The Superintendent of Schools for the Unit, appointed by the Minister of Education, was responsible for the general supervision of the schools and conferred with teachers and the Board on various issues.

In 1978, the Larger School Units Act was replaced by the Education Act (SS 1978). Outlook School Unit No. 32 became Outlook School Division No. 32 effective January 1, 1979.

Bjorkdale (Sask.), 1968-

  • LGA 50
  • Local Government
  • 1968-

Bjorkdale is an urban municipality which was founded as a town in 1928 and later incorporated as a village on April 1, 1968. Bjorkdale is an agricultural based community in the eastern central part of Saskatchewan, approximately 170 kilometres south east of Prince Albert, Saskatchewan. It is located on NE 14-43-12 in the Rural Municipality of Bjorkdale No. 426.

The town of Bjorkdale was named for Charles Bjork, of Sweden, who settled two miles east of the present townsite in 1904.

The village is governed by an elected council that can hire staff to manage daily administration and maintain municipal services, such as roads, utilities and recreation facilities. The responsibilities of the council include enforcing bylaws; waste collection/landfill; fire protection; maintaining public utilities, roads and streets; issuing tax and assessment notices and collecting taxes and other fees.

The village currently (2009) has a population of 201 and is administered by a mayor, two councilors and an administrator.

Balcarres School Division No. 87, 1979-1993

  • LGA 57
  • Local Government
  • 1979-1993

The Balcarres Consolidated School District No. 87 of Saskatchewan became the Balcarres School Division No. 87 of Saskatchewan effective January 1, 1979, pursuant to the Education Act (S.S. 1978, c.17) to administrate schools in the Balcarres area. The Board of the school division was responsible for administering the public elementary and secondary schools within its borders. The eight member Board was elected through a public vote. Funding to administer and operate the schools in the Division was provided through provincial grants and locally-generated revenue. The Division was located within the Qu'Appelle Valley Superintendency No. 27.

The responsibilities of the Board were the same as those assigned to the separate and francophone school boards in the province. The Board's duties and powers included administering and managing the educational affairs of the school division; exercising general supervision and control over the schools in the division; approving administrative procedures pertaining to the internal organization, management and supervision of the schools; providing and maintaining school accommodation, equipment and facilities; and appointing and employing qualified teachers, principals and other necessary staff.

In the fall of 1992, the Department of Education created the Scenic Valley School Division. Balcarres School Division No. 87 became part of Scenic Valley School Division No. 117 effective January 1, 1993.

Cupar School Division No. 28 of Saskatchewan, 1979-2003

  • LGA 59
  • Local Government
  • 1979-2003

The Cupar School Division No. 28 of Saskatchewan was established on January 1, 1979 with the dissolution of Cupar School Unit No. 28 of Saskatchewan, pursuant to The Education Act (S.S. 1978, c. 17). The Board of the school division was responsible for administering the public elementary and secondary schools within its borders. The six member Board was elected through public vote. Funding to administer and operate the schools in the Division was provided through provincial grants and locally-generated revenue.

The responsibilities of the Board were the same as those assigned to the separate and francophone school boards in the province. The Board's duties and powers included administering and managing the educational affairs of the School Division; exercising general supervision and control over the schools in the division; approving administrative procedures pertaining to the internal organization, management and supervision of the schools; providing and maintaining school accommodation, equipment and facilities; and appointing and employing qualified teachers, principals and other necessary staff.

In the fall of 2003, the Saskatchewan Department of Education created the Qu'Appelle Valley School Division No. 139. Cupar School Division No. 28 became part of Qu'Appelle Valley School Division No. 139 effective January 1, 2004.

Unity (Sask.), 1919-

  • LGA 62
  • Local Government
  • 1919-

The Town of Unity is an urban municipality in west central Saskatchewan incorporated on November 1, 1919. Unity is located 90 kilometres south-west of the Battlefords and 200 kilometres west of the City of Saskatoon. Its exact geographical location is NW18-40-22-W3. Located in the Rural Municipality of Round Valley No. 410, Unity is believed to have been named after Unity, Wisconsin, the original home of many of the early settlers in the Unity district.

The town is governed by a council consisting of a mayor and at least two councillors, each elected for a three year term. The goals of the council are to provide good government; provide necessary services and facilities for all or part of the municipality; develop and maintain a safe and viable community; and foster economic, social and environmental well-being. The council holds jurisdiction over police and fire protection; water and sewer utilities; parks and recreation and waste management.

The council makes decisions and exercises its power through the passage of resolutions and bylaws. Bylaws enforced by council include those relating to building; wild and domestic animals; nuisances; transport and transportation systems; streets and roads; businesses and business activities; signs and zoning. Council is also responsible for the collection of revenues; issuing of tax and assessment notices; administration of the operating and capital budgets and preparation of annual financial statements.

The Town of Unity is currently (2009) administered by a mayor, six councillors, and an administrator (previously known as the town clerk). The administrator oversees the day to day operations of the municipality, advises on policy and ensures council policies are carried out. The council currently holds regular meetings open to the public on the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month.

Rural Municipality of Prairie Rose No. 309, 1910-

  • LGA 70
  • Local Government
  • 1910-

The Rural Municipality of Prairie Rose No. 309 of Saskatchewan was incorporated on December 12, 1910 pursuant to the Rural Municipalities Act (S.S. 1908-09, c.6). The first reeve elected was E. G. Fisher. The first councilors were R. Copeland, William Smalley, J. Langelle, George Postier, Fred Ceal, and William Davidson. The first secretary-treasurer was Robert Graham. The municipality, located southeast of Saskatoon, encompasses the village of Jansen and the hamlet of Esk. It serves the area located in ranges 19, 20 and 21, townships 31, 32, and 33, west of the second meridian. It was named by Mr. Jansen after the roses that grew in the area.

The municipal office is located in Jansen. The municipality is currently (2009) administered by a reeve, six councilors and an administrator, previously known as the secretary-treasurer. Their responsibilities include passing by-laws, maintaining cemeteries, collecting taxes, assisting in maintaining hospitals and roads and preventing cruelty to animals. The Council meets once per month.

The population in the rural municipality has declined over time. In 1910, there were 452 residents. The population as of 2009 is 292.

Ituna (Sask.), 1910-1961

  • LGA 75
  • Local Government
  • 1910-1961

The Village of Ituna was an urban municipality in east central Saskatchewan. It was incorporated on May 30, 1910 in accordance with The Village Act. The village was located 55 kilometres north west of Melville and was situated on three provincial highways (nos. 15, 52 and 310) and the Canadian National Railways mainline between Winnipeg, Manitoba and Saskatoon. The name of the village was believed to be chosen by engineers of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway. The village was located in the Rural Municipality of Ituna Bon Accord No. 246 and served as the administrative centre of the rural municipality.

The village was governed by an elected council consisting of an overseer (later known as mayor) and councillors. The council was responsible for enforcing by-laws; waste collection and landfill; fire protection; issuing tax and assessment notices; maintaining public utilities, roads and streets and collecting taxes and other fees. The council hired staff to manage the daily administration and maintain municipal services, such as roads, utilities and recreational facilities. The secretary-treasurer (later known as the clerk) was responsible for the day to day operations and ensured that council was adhering to policy.

On October 1, 1961, the status of the village was changed when it became the Town of Ituna.

Tate (Sask.), 1909-1961

  • LGA 82
  • Local Government
  • 1909-1961

The Village of Tate was an urban municipality incorporated in 1909, under the provisions of The Village Ordinance. The Village was governed by an elected council that could hire staff to manage daily administration and maintain municipal services, such as roads, utilities and recreation facilities. The responsibilities of the council included enforcing bylaws; waste collection/landfill; fire protection; maintaining public utilities, roads and streets; issuing tax and assessment notices and collecting taxes and other fees.

The Village of Tate was an agricultural-based community located on the north-east corner of Section 36, Township 28, Range 21, west of the second meridian, 13 kilometres northwest of the Village of Semans in central Saskatchewan. The Village was found near Highway 15 between highways 6 and 20 and was located within the Rural Municipality of Mount Hope No. 276. The Village was named after D'Arcy Tate, solicitor for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway.

The village was disorganized in 1961.

Rural Municipality of Swift Current No. 137, 1910-

  • LGA 85
  • Local Government
  • 1910-

The Rural Municipality of Swift Current No. 137 of Saskatchewan was incorporated on December 12, 1910 pursuant to the Rural Municipalities Act (S.S. 1908-09, c. 6). The first municipal officials elected were Cy Newell (Reeve), James Wallace, C. Stevens, W. Burnett, E.H. Dart, H. Davison, and C.H. Carefoot (Councillors). The municipality is located in southwest Saskatchewan and encompasses the area located in ranges 13, 14, and 15 and townships 13, 14, 15, and 16, west of the third meridian. The municipal office is located in the city of Swift Current.

The municipality is currently (2010) governed by an elected council comprised of a reeve and six councillors. All decisions are made by resolution or by-law. Council is assisted by an administrator, who manages the daily operations, and other staff required to maintain municipal services, such as roads, utilities and recreational facilities.

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