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Saskatchewan. Judicial District of Swift Current

  • GA 80
  • Primary Agency
  • 1913-1958

Judicial districts were geographical areas in Saskatchewan over which the courts held legal jurisdiction. Judicial boundaries pre-determined the centre where cases had to be heard. Criminal matters were usually heard in the judicial district where the crime occurred while civil matters were heard where the plaintiff or defendant resided or where the property in dispute was located.

In 1913, the boundaries of the Judicial District of Moose Jaw were altered, resulting in the establishment of the Judicial District of Swift Current on May 1, 1913. The boundaries of the district were altered several times during its existence.

The Judicial District of Swift Current was located in the south-west part of the province. The centre of the district was located in the city of Swift Current, 170 kilometres west of the city of Moose Jaw and 218 kilometres east of Medicine Hat, Alberta. The courthouse was located at 121 Lorne Street West.

Towns and villages located in the judicial district at some point during its existence were Aneroid; Cabri; Gull Lake; Herbert; Leader; Maple Creek; Morse; Ponteix; Prussia; Swift Current; Tompkins; and Woodrow.

Courts holding jurisdiction in the district included the Supreme Court; the Court of King's Bench; the Court of Queen's Bench; the District Court; and the Surrogate Court. Both criminal and civil cases were heard in the judicial district. Criminal offences included arson; robbery; theft; murder; manslaughter; treason; kidnapping; assault; sexual assault; blackmail; extortion and perjury. Civil matters included divorce; contract disputes; foreclosures; the administration of estates of the deceased and probate of wills; small claims (debt) matters and property disputes.

A resident judge presided at the various court sittings. Court officials included a Clerk of the Supreme Court; a local registrar for the Court of King's Bench/Queen's Bench; a Clerk and Deputy Clerk of the District Court; a Clerk and Deputy Clerk of the Surrogate Court; a sheriff and deputy sheriff; court reporters and process issuers (servers). Local registrars processed court documents; received documents for filing; kept accounting records and acted as clerks of the court at all courtroom and chamber sessions. Sheriffs executed court orders; served legal documents and enforced statute orders.

In 1958, all existing judicial districts were abolished and the province of Saskatchewan became one judicial district with twenty-one judicial centres. The Judicial District of Swift Current became the Judicial Centre of Swift Current.

Saskatchewan. Judicial District of Wilkie

  • GA 81
  • Primary Agency
  • 1922-1958

Judicial districts were geographical areas in Saskatchewan over which the courts held legal jurisdiction. Judicial boundaries pre-determined the centre where cases had to be heard. Criminal matters were usually heard in the judicial district where the crime occurred while civil matters were heard where the plaIntiff or defendant resided or where the property in dispute was located.

The Judicial District of Wilkie was established on May 1, 1922. The geographical area it occupied was previously known as the Judicial District of Scott. The boundaries of the Wilkie Judicial District were altered several times during its existence.

The Judicial District of Wilkie was located in the west central part of the province. The centre of the district was located in the town of Wilkie, 150 kilometres west of Saskatoon and 58 kilometres south of the Battlefords.

Towns and villages located in the judicial district at some point during its existence were Cando; Denzil; Landis; Macklin; Primate; Senlac; Scott; Unity and Wilkie.

Courts holding jurisdiction in the district included the Court of King's Bench; the Court of Queen's Bench; the District Court; and the Surrogate Court. Both criminal and civil cases were heard in the judicial district. Criminal offences included arson; robbery; theft; murder; manslaughter; treason; kidnapping; assault; sexual assault; blackmail; extortion and perjury. Civil matters included divorce; contract disputes; foreclosures; the administration of estates of the deceased and probate of wills; small claims (debt) matters and property disputes.

A resident judge presided at the various court sittings. Court officials included a local registrar for the Court of King's Bench/Queen's Bench; a Clerk and Deputy Clerk of the District Court; a Clerk and Deputy Clerk of the Surrogate Court; a sheriff and deputy sheriff; court reporters and process issuers (servers). Local registrars processed court documents; received documents for filing; kept accounting records and acted as clerks of the court at all courtroom and chamber sessions. Sheriffs executed court orders; served legal documents and enforced statute orders.

In 1958, all existing judicial districts were abolished and the province of Saskatchewan became one judicial district with twenty-one judicial centres. The Judicial District of Wilkie became the Judicial Centre of Wilkie.

Saskatchewan. Judicial District of Leader

  • GA 90
  • Primary Agency
  • 1923-1931

Judicial districts were geographical areas in Saskatchewan over which the courts held legal jurisdiction. Judicial boundaries pre-determined the centre where cases had to be heard. Criminal matters were usually heard in the judicial district where the crime occurred while civil matters were heard where the plaintiff or defendant resided or where the property in dispute was located.

In 1923, the boundaries of the Judicial District of Swift Current were altered, resulting in the establishment of the Judicial District of Leader on August 15, 1923. The Judicial District of Leader was located in the south-west part of the province near the Saskatchewan/Alberta border. The centre of the district was located in the town of Leader.

Towns and villages in the judicial district at some point during its existence were Abbey; Burstall; Fox Valley; Lancer; Leader; Portreeve; Prelate and Sceptre.

Courts holding jurisdiction in the judicial district included the Court of King's Bench; the District Court; and the Surrogate Court. Both criminal and civil cases were heard in the judicial district. Criminal offences included arson; robbery; theft; murder; manslaughter; treason; kidnapping; assault; sexual assault; blackmail; extortion and perjury. Civil matters included divorce; contract disputes; foreclosures; the administration of estates of the deceased and probate of wills; small claims (debt) matters and property disputes.

A resident judge presided at the various court sittings. Court officials included a local registrar for the Court of King's Bench; a Clerk and Deputy Clerk of the District Court; a Clerk and Deputy Clerk of the Surrogate Court; a sheriff and deputy sheriff; court reporters and process issuers (servers). Local registrars processed court documents; received documents for filing; kept accounting records and acted as clerks of the court at all courtroom and chamber sessions. Sheriffs executed court orders; served legal documents and enforced statute orders.

The Judicial District of Leader was disestablished on July 2, 1931. The area it occupied was absorbed by the judicial districts of Maple Creek, Swift Current and Kindersley.

Saskatchewan. Judicial District of Scott

  • GA 91
  • Primary Agency
  • 1913-1922

Judicial districts were geographical areas in Saskatchewan over which the courts held legal jurisdiction. Judicial boundaries pre-determined the centre where cases had to be heard. Criminal matters were usually heard in the judicial district where the crime occurred while civil matters were heard where the plaintiff or defendant resided or where the property in dispute was located.

In 1913, the boundaries of the judicial districts of Battleford and Saskatoon were altered, resulting in the establishment of the Judicial District of Scott. The Judicial District of Scott was located in the west-central part of the province. The centre of the district was located in the town of Scott.

Towns and villages in the judicial district at some point during its existence were Adanac; Biggar; Cando; Denzil; Landis; Macklin; Perdue; Primate; Salvador; Scott; Senlac; Unity; Vance and Wilkie.

Courts holding jurisdiction in the judicial district included the Supreme Court; the Court of King's Bench; the District Court; and the Surrogate Court. Both criminal and civil cases were heard in the judicial district. Criminal offences included arson; robbery; theft; murder; manslaughter; treason; kidnapping; assault; sexual assault; blackmail; extortion and perjury. Civil matters included divorce; contract disputes; foreclosures; the administration of estates of the deceased and probate of wills; small claims (debt) matters and property disputes.

A resident judge presided at the various court sittings. Court officials included a local registrar for the Court of King's Bench; a Clerk and Deputy Clerk of the District Court; a Clerk and Deputy Clerk of the Surrogate Court; a sheriff and deputy sheriff; court reporters and process issuers (servers). Local registrars processed court documents; received documents for filing; kept accounting records and acted as clerks of the court at all courtroom and chamber sessions. Sheriffs executed court orders; served legal documents and enforced statute orders.

On May 1, 1922, the Judicial District of Scott became the Judicial District of Wilkie.

Saskatchewan. Judicial District of Regina

  • GA 97
  • Primary Agency
  • 1907-1958

Judicial districts were geographical areas in Saskatchewan over which the courts held legal jurisdiction. Judicial boundaries pre-determined the centre where cases had to be heard. Criminal matters were usually heard in the judicial district where the crime occurred while civil matters were heard where the plaintiff or defendant resided or where the property in dispute was located.

The Judicial District of Regina was established in 1907. It was one of the original eight judicial districts established in 1907 as part of the reorganization of Saskatchewan's judicial system after becoming a province in 1905. The boundaries of the Regina District were altered several times during its existence, most notably in 1913, when its boundaries were considerably reduced. The Judicial District of Regina was located in the central part of the province. The centre of the district was located in the city of Regina. The courthouse was located at 2006 Victoria Avenue.

Towns and villages in the judicial district at some point during its existence were Abernethy; Balgonie; Bethune; Craik; Cupar; Davidson; Fillmore; Indian head; Lumsden; Milestone; Pense; Sedley and Strasbourg.

Courts holding jurisdiction in the judicial district included the Supreme Court; the Court of King's Bench; the Court of Queen's Bench; the District Court and the Surrogate Court. Both criminal and civil cases were heard in the judicial district. Criminal offences included arson; robbery; theft; murder; manslaughter; treason; kidnapping; assault; sexual assault; blackmail; extortion and perjury. Civil matters included divorce; contract disputes; foreclosures; the administration of estates of the deceased and probate of wills; small claims (debt) matters and property disputes.

A resident judge presided at the various court sittings. Court officials included a Clerk of the Supreme Court; a local registrar for the Court of King's Bench/Queen's Bench; a Clerk and Deputy Clerk of the District Court; a Clerk and Deputy Clerk of the Surrogate Court; a sheriff and deputy sheriff; court reports and process issuers (servers). Local registrars processed court documents; received documents for filing; kept accounting records and acted as clerks of the court at all courtroom and chamber sessions. Sheriffs executed court orders; served legal documents and enforced statute orders.

In 1958, all existing judicial districts were abolished and the province of Saskatchewan became one judicial district with twenty-one judicial centres. The Judicial District of Regina became the Judicial Centre of Regina.

Saskatchewan. Judicial District of Battleford

  • GA 93
  • Primary Agency
  • 1907-1958

Judicial districts were geographical areas in Saskatchewan over which the courts held legal jurisdiction. Judicial boundaries pre-determined the centre where cases had to be heard. Criminal matters were usually heard in the judicial district where the crime occurred while civil matters were heard where the plaintiff or defendant resided or where the property in dispute was located.

The Judicial District of Battleford was established in 1907. It was one of the original eight judicial districts established in 1907 as part of the reorganization of Saskatchewan's judicial system after becoming a province in 1905. The boundaries of the Battleford Judicial District were altered several times during its existence. The Judicial District of Battleford was located in the north-west part of the province. The centre of the district was located in the town of Battleford, on the Yellowhead Highway between Lloydminster and Saskatoon and across the North Saskatchewan River from the city of North Battleford. The courthouse was located at 291-23rd Street West.

Towns and villages in the judicial district at some point during its existence were Battleford; Beauval; Blaine Lake; Buffalo Narrows; Cut Knife; Edam; Hafford; Ile-A-La-Crosse; Lashburn; Lloydminster; Maidstone; Meadow Lake; Medstead; North Battleford; Paynton; Radisson; Spiritwood; St. Walburg and Turtleford.

Courts holding jurisdiction in the judicial district included the Supreme Court; the Court of King's Bench; the Court of Queen's Bench; the District Court and the Surrogate Court. Both criminal and civil cases were heard in the judicial district. Criminal offences included arson; robbery; theft; murder; manslaughter; treason; kidnapping; assault; sexual assault; blackmail; extortion and perjury. Civil matters included divorce; contract disputes; foreclosures; the administration of estates of the deceased and probate of wills; small claims (debt) matters and property disputes.

A resident judge presided at the various court sittings. Court officials included a Clerk of the Supreme Court; a local registrar for the Court of King's Bench/Queen's Bench; a Clerk and Deputy Clerk of the District Court; a Clerk and Deputy Clerk of the Surrogate Court; a sheriff and deputy sheriff; court reports and process issuers (servers). Local registrars processed court documents; received documents for filing; kept accounting records and acted as clerks of the court at all courtroom and chamber sessions. Sheriffs executed court orders; served legal documents and enforced statute orders.

In 1958, the province of Saskatchewan became one judicial district with twenty-one judicial centres. The Judicial District of Battleford became the Judicial Centre of Battleford.

Saskatchewan. Judicial District of Prince Albert

  • GA 96
  • Primary Agency
  • 1907-1958

Judicial districts were geographical areas in Saskatchewan over which the courts held legal jurisdiction. Judicial boundaries pre-determined the centre where cases had to be heard. Criminal matters were usually heard in the judicial district where the crime occurred while civil matters were heard where the plaintiff or defendant resided or where the property in dispute was located.

The Judicial District of Prince Albert was established in 1907. It was one of the original eight judicial districts established in 1907 as part of the reorganization of Saskatchewan's judicial system after becoming a province in 1905. The boundaries of the Prince Albert District were altered several times during its existence, most notably in 1920, when its boundaries were considerably reduced to accommodate the formation of the Judicial District of Melfort. The Judicial District of Prince Albert was located in the north central part of the province. The centre of the district was located in the city of Prince Albert, located on the banks of the North Saskatchewan River.

Towns and villages in the judicial district at some point during its existence were Birch Hills; Canwood; Duck Lake; Kinistino; Leask; Marcelin; Melfort; Rosthern; Shellbrook; Tisdale and Wakaw.

Courts holding jurisdiction in the judicial district included the Supreme Court; the Court of King's Bench; the Court of Queen's Bench; the District Court and the Surrogate Court. Both criminal and civil cases were heard in the judicial district. Criminal offences included arson; robbery; theft; murder; manslaughter; treason; kidnapping; assault; sexual assault; blackmail; extortion and perjury. Civil matters included divorce; contract disputes; foreclosures; the administration of estates of the deceased and probate of wills; small claims (debt) matters and property disputes.

A resident judge presided at the various court sittings. Court officials included a Clerk of the Supreme Court; a local registrar for the Court of King's Bench/Queen's Bench; a Clerk and Deputy Clerk of the District Court; a Clerk and Deputy Clerk of the Surrogate Court; a sheriff and deputy sheriff; court reports and process issuers (servers). Local registrars processed court documents; received documents for filing; kept accounting records and acted as clerks of the court at all courtroom and chamber sessions. Sheriffs executed court orders; served legal documents and enforced statute orders.

In 1958, all existing judicial districts were abolished and the province of Saskatchewan became one judicial district with twenty-one judicial centres. The Judicial District of Prince Albert became the Judicial Centre of Prince Albert.

Saskatchewan. Judicial District of Cannington

  • GA 98
  • Primary Agency
  • 1907-1922

Judicial districts were geographical areas in Saskatchewan over which the courts held legal jurisdiction. Judicial boundaries pre-determined the centre where cases had to be heard. Criminal matters were usually heard in the judicial district where the crime occurred while civil matters were heard where the plaintiff or defendant resided or where the property in dispute was located.

The Judicial District of Cannington was established in 1907. It was one of the original eight judicial districts established in 1907 as part of the reorganization of Saskatchewan's judicial system after becoming a province in 1905. The boundaries of the Cannington Judicial District were altered several times, most notably in 1913 when its boundaries were reduced to accommodate the establishment of the Judicial District of Estevan.

The Judicial District of Cannington was located in the south-east part of the province. The centre of the district was located in the town of Arcola, 60 kilometres north and 40 kilometres east of Estevan. The courthouse in Arcola was constructed around 1908.

Towns and villages located in the judicial district at some point during its existence were Alameda; Antler; Arcola; Bienfait; Carlyle; Carnduff; Creelman; Forget; Heward; Kisbey; Manor; Maryfield; Parkman; Redvers; Stoughton; Wawota and Wordsworth.

Courts holding jurisdiction in the judicial district included the Supreme Court; the Court of King's Bench; the District Court and the Surrogate Court. Both criminal and civil cases were heard in the judicial district. Criminal offences included arson; robbery; theft; murder; manslaughter; treason; kidnapping; assault; sexual assault; blackmail; extortion and perjury. Civil matters included divorce; contract disputes; foreclosures; the administration of estates of the deceased and probate of wills; small claims (debt) matters and property disputes.

A resident judge presided at the various court sittings. Court officials included a Clerk of the Supreme Court; a local registrar for the Court of King's Bench; a Clerk and Deputy Clerk of the District Court; a Clerk and Deputy Clerk of the Surrogate Court; a sheriff and deputy sheriff; court reports and process issuers (servers). Local registrars processed court documents; received documents for filing; kept accounting records and acted as clerks of the court at all courtroom and chamber sessions. Sheriffs executed court orders; served legal documents and enforced statute orders.

In 1922, the Judicial District of Cannington became the Judicial District of Arcola.

Bjorkdale (Sask.), 1968-

  • LGA 50
  • Local Government
  • 1968-

Bjorkdale is an urban municipality which was founded as a town in 1928 and later incorporated as a village on April 1, 1968. Bjorkdale is an agricultural based community in the eastern central part of Saskatchewan, approximately 170 kilometres south east of Prince Albert, Saskatchewan. It is located on NE 14-43-12 in the Rural Municipality of Bjorkdale No. 426.

The town of Bjorkdale was named for Charles Bjork, of Sweden, who settled two miles east of the present townsite in 1904.

The village is governed by an elected council that can hire staff to manage daily administration and maintain municipal services, such as roads, utilities and recreation facilities. The responsibilities of the council include enforcing bylaws; waste collection/landfill; fire protection; maintaining public utilities, roads and streets; issuing tax and assessment notices and collecting taxes and other fees.

The village currently (2009) has a population of 201 and is administered by a mayor, two councilors and an administrator.

Wolseley School Division No. 25, 1979-1993

  • LGA 56
  • Local Government
  • 1979-1993

The Wolseley Consolidated School District No. 25 of Saskatchewan became the Wolseley School Division No. 25 of Saskatchewan effective January 1, 1979, pursuant to the Education Act (S.S. 1978, c.17). The Division was based around Wolseley, Saskatchewan. The Board of the school division was responsible for administering the public elementary and secondary schools within its borders. The five member Board was elected through public vote. Funding to administer and operate the schools in the Division was provided through provincial grants and locally-generated revenue. The Division was located within the Qu'Appelle Valley Superintendency No. 27.

The responsibilities of the Board were the same as those assigned to the separate and francophone school boards in the province. The Board's duties and powers included administering and managing the educational affairs of the school division; exercising general supervision and control over the schools in the division; approving administrative procedures pertaining to the internal organization, management and supervision of the schools; providing and maintaining school accommodation, equipment and facilities; and appointing and employing qualified teachers, principals and other necessary staff.

In the fall of 1992, the Department of Education created the Scenic Valley School Division. Wolseley School Division No. 25 became part of Scenic Valley School Division No. 117 effective January 1, 1993.

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