Showing 7499 results

Geauthoriseerde beschrijving

North-West Territories. Executive Committee

  • GA 134
  • Primary Agency
  • 1891-1897

Advisory Committee from 1888 to 1891 Executive Committee 1891-1897 Advisory Council replaced with Executive Committee members took an oath of office, one member was designated Chair, and the Lieutenant Governor was not included in its membership Haultain chair of committee for duration
executive government in Lieutenant Governor and Executive Committee

Haultain chairman of committee decide how to spend Dominion grant first Executive Committe Haultain, James Clinkskill, Neff, Tweed

Saskatchewan. Dept. of Social Services. Corrections Division

  • GA 142
  • Secondary Agency
  • 1972-1983

The Corrections Division of the Department of Social Services was established on October 1, 1972 as part of a departmental reorganization. Creation of the division stemmed from the recommendations of the 1971 Saskatchewan Corrections Study Committee that all correctional services be integrated into one organizational unit. Personnel responsible for the division included a director of corrections, a chief probation officer, a director of community corrections and an institutional planner. The director of corrections reported to the department's deputy minister.

The key functional areas of the division were correctional centres, probation programs and community corrections programs. At its establishment, the division was responsible for the administration of correctional centres at Regina (which housed male offenders from southern Saskatchewan), at Prince Albert (those from northern Saskatchewan) and at the Pine Grove Centre in Prince Albert (female offenders from all of Saskatchewan). The department's Northern Regional Office also administered small correctional facilities at Buffalo Narrows, Creighton and Besnard Lake for low to medium-risk offenders residing in the far north of the province. A new provincial correctional centre opened in Saskatoon in 1981, as did a replacement facility for men in Prince Albert. A community correctional centre was established in North Battleford in 1980.

Typically, offenders housed at these correctional facilities were serving: sentences of less than two years; were remanded while awaiting trial or sentencing; or were sentenced to federal penitentiaries but were awaiting decision from the Court of Appeal. The larger correctional centres at Regina, Prince Albert and Saskatoon were organized into three function-based areas: custody; treatment; and support services (laundry, kitchen, clerical, etc.). Treatment and rehabilitation programs offered to offenders while in custody included: work camps; vocational and academic training; group activities and recreation; medical and dental services; counselling; family therapy; and allowances for temporary absences. Parole services were coordinated by the institutions in cooperation with the National Parole Board.

Probation programs and services were delivered primarily by probation officers staffed at regional offices throughout the province. The two key functions of probation officers were to prepare pre-sentence reports and to supervise offenders on probation. The preparation of pre-sentence reports involved investigation into the circumstances leading to the offence, assessment of the offender to determine a personality profile, and establishment of a rehabilitation program for the offender. This program was then monitored as part of the supervision of the offender during the period of probation.

Various probation programs and services were established by the division, including: the Indian Probation Office Program (1975); Volunteers in Probation (1976); probation hostels (1980); attendance centres (1980); and the Impaired Driver's Treatment Program (1980). These programs were aimed at diversifying the opportunities for offenders on probation to rehabilitate, thus avoiding further offences.

Community corrections offered programs and services that protected society while providing rehabilitation opportunities to offenders, often outside the confines of a correctional facility. The Community Training Residence program offered residence and rehabilitation opportunities for low-risk offenders through employment, academic and vocational training, counselling, and addictions treatment from a variety of community resources. The Fine Option Program was established in 1975 as a means for offenders to work off fines through volunteer service at community agencies rather than face incarceration for non-payment of fines. The Bail Verification and Supervision Program, introduced in 1982, assisted courts in determining which offenders could be released under surety or supervision while awaiting trial. Also introduced in 1982, the Restitution Program provided an alternative measure for property crime offenders to reimburse their victims the monetary value of the damage or loss from their crime rather than being incarcerated.

The Corrections Division of the Department of Social Services was discontinued on April 30, 1983 upon the establishment of the Department of Justice. Responsibilities of the division were transferred to the Corrections Division of the new department.

Saskatchewan. Dept. of Justice. Corrections and Justice Services Division

  • GA 145
  • Secondary Agency
  • 1987-1991

The Corrections and Justice Services Division of the Department of Justice was established in 1987 as an amalgamation of the department's former Justice Services and Corrections Divisions. The new division was responsible for the administration of court, correctional and property registration services and programs in Saskatchewan. At its establishment, the division was organized into three primary branches: Court Services Branch; Corrections Branch; and Property Registration Branch. The division was lead by an Assistant Deputy Minister, Terry Thompson, who reported to the department's Deputy Minister.

The Court Services Branch provided administrative and operational support to the Courts of Saskatchewan. The branch was organized into four units: Sheriff Services; Registrar of Courts; Court Operations; and Administrative Support. The Sheriff Services Unit provided the services of sheriffs and sheriff's officers throughout the province. Duties of this personnel in the unit included the execution of court orders, serving of legal documents and the enforcement of statute orders. The Registrar of Courts provided advice and support to Local Registrars around the province. The Court Operations Unit administered the Court of Appeal, Court of Queen's Bench, Surrogate Court, Unified Family Court and the Automatic Enforcement of Maintenance Orders program. It also provided non-judicial administration of the Provincial Court of Saskatchewan and the Traffic Safety Court of Saskatchewan. Acts administered by the Unit included The Commissioner for Oaths Act, The Notaries Public Act and The Marriage Act. The unit also oversaw the training and support services for the province's Justices of the Peace. The Administrative Support Unit provided financial and administrative support for the branch. In addition, it was responsible for the Provincial Court Management Information System. By 1990, a fifth unit, the Maintenance Enforcement Office, was added. The Office assisted recipients of court-ordered maintenance with the enforcement of their orders.

The Corrections Branch was organized into two sub-branches: Institutional Operations and Community Operations. The Institutional Operations Branch was responsible for the administration of facilities and programs for the custody and care of adult offenders sentenced to terms of less than two years. Provincial correctional centres were located at Regina, Saskatoon, Prince Albert (all for male offenders) and at the Pine Grove (Women's) Centre in Prince Albert. The branch also operated a community correctional centre at North Battleford for offenders serving terms of less than four months. The division's northern region administered a small community correctional centre at Buffalo Narrows for low to medium-risk offenders residing in the far north of the province. Programs offered to offenders while in custody included: vocational and academic training; group activities and recreation; medical and dental services; counselling; and family therapy. Parole services were coordinated by the institutions in cooperation with the National Parole Board. Five community training residences offered residence and rehabilitation opportunities for low-risk offenders and probationers through employment, academic and vocational training, counselling, and addictions treatment. Nine correctional camps were located primarily at provincial parks throughout the province where low-risk offenders lived and worked while serving their terms. Administrative Release Programs included the Work Incentive, Conditional Release and Institutional Fine Option programs.

The Community Operations Branch was responsible for the administration of programs and services aimed at protecting society while providing probation and rehabilitation opportunities to offenders outside the confines of a correctional facility. Probation programs and services were delivered primarily by probation officers staffed at regional offices throughout the province. The two key functions of probation officers were to prepare pre-sentence reports and to supervise offenders on probation.
Other community-based corrections programs administered by the branch included the Fine Option Program, Community Service Order Program, Bail Verification and Supervision Program, the Restitution Program, Volunteers in Probation program and the Impaired Driver's Treatment Program.

The Property Management Branch administered the systems of registration for real property (the Land Titles System) and personal property (the Personal Property Registry). The director of the branch also held the office of Master of Titles. The Land Titles System included the examination and registry of land-related documents, and the issuance and of titles. A network of land titles offices throughout the province responded to title enquiries and registration submissions. The Chief Surveyor examined and approved the registrations made from these offices. The Personal Property Registry provided a notice filing system wherein a secured party could register a financing statement expressing an interest in the personal property of a debtor. It also provided an enquiry system for individuals intending on purchasing personal property to search and request information related to the property.

The Corrections and Justice Services Division of the Department of Justice was discontinued in 1991 as a result of a departmental reorganization. Responsibility for corrections was transferred to the department's newly-established Solicitor General Division, while court services and property registry were transferred to the newly-established Registry Services Division.

Saskatchewan. Dept. of Justice. Solicitor General Division

  • GA 146
  • Secondary Agency
  • 1991-1993

The Solicitor General Division of the Department of Justice was established in January 1991. The division assumed responsibility for policing services, firearms control and the coroners' office from the department's Administration Division and corrections services from the Corrections and Justice Services Division. It was organized into the branches of Policing, Community Operations and Institutional Operations. Responsibility for the division was held by an Assistant Deputy Minister, Terry Thompson, who reported to the department's Deputy Minister.

The Policing Branch was responsible for provincial policing services, administration of the federal Firearms Control Program, the Chief Coroner's office and its network of coroners throughout the province, and the licensing of private investigators and security guards. It negotiated and administered contracts with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) for police services delivered from 115 detachments in the province. It also oversaw the Aboriginal Constable Program that provided RCMP services to First Nations communities.

The Community Operations Branch was responsible for the administration of corrections programs and services aimed at protecting society while providing probation and alternative rehabilitation measures to offenders outside the confines of a correctional facility. Probation programs and services were delivered primarily by probation officers staffed at regional offices throughout the province. The two key functions of probation officers were to prepare pre-sentence reports and to supervise offenders on probation. Other community-based corrections programs administered by the branch included: the Intensive Probation Supervision / Electronic Monitoring Program; Intensive Community Program; Fine Option Program; Community Service Order Program; Bail Verification and Supervision Program; the Restitution Program; Volunteers in Probation; program and the Impaired Driver's Treatment Program.

The Institutional Operations Branch was responsible for the administration of corrections facilities and programs for the custody and care of adult offenders sentenced to terms of less than two years. Provincial correctional centres were located at Regina, Saskatoon, Prince Albert (all for male offenders) and at the Pine Grove (Women's) Centre in Prince Albert. The branch also operated a community correctional centre at North Battleford for offenders serving terms of less than four months. The division's northern region administered a small community correctional centre at Buffalo Narrows for low to medium-risk offenders residing in the far north of the province. Programs offered to offenders while in custody included: vocational and academic training; group activities and recreation; medical and dental services; counselling; and family therapy. Parole services were coordinated by the institutions in cooperation with the National Parole Board. Community training residences offered residence and rehabilitation opportunities for low-risk offenders and probationers through employment, academic and vocational training, counselling, and addictions treatment. Correctional camps were located primarily at provincial parks throughout the province where low-risk offenders lived and worked while serving their terms. Administrative Release Programs included the Work Incentive, Conditional Release and Institutional Fine Option programs.

The Solicitor General Division of the Department of Justice was discontinued in 1993 as a result of a departmental reorganization. Responsibility for corrections was transferred to the department's newly-established Corrections Division, while all other responsibilities were transferred to the newly-established Policing and Security Services Division.

Saskatchewan Liquor Board

  • GA 148
  • Primary Agency
  • 1925-1993

The Saskatchewan Liquor Board was established in accordance with The Liquor Act, 1925, on January 16, 1925. As legislated by the Act, the Board was comprised of one to three members appointed by the Lieutenant Governor. From the members, a chairman was designated to oversee the administration and daily operation of the Board in the distribution, permission for use, control and sales of liquor in Saskatchewan. Senior personnel reporting to the chairman included the chief inspector, chief accountant and warehouse manager. The head office and warehouse for the Saskatchewan Liquor Board was located in Regina.

On April 16, 1925, the Board opened eleven liquor stores that sold spirits, beer and wine. Additional liquor stores, as well as those only selling beer, were opened in communities throughout Saskatchewan after the Board served notice of intention to establish in accordance with the Act. The sale of wine at beer stores was added in 1932. Beer and wine stores ceased operation in 1959 and were either converted to full liquor stores or closed. The Board also administered permits for the use of liquor at banquets and special occasions, in special quantities, and by medical, dental and veterinary professionals in their practices.

In adherence to Section 14 of the Act, the Board established and oversaw a system of numbered districts in the province to administer the Act. Residents of age in each district were given the opportunity to petition for or against the establishment of liquor or beer and wine stores in their district. Subsequently, a vote on the issue was held if the required number of eligible voters had signed the petition. Further opportunities for petition and vote came in 1935 when an amendment to the Act provided for the issuance of licenses for beer to be sold by the glass in licensed men's parlours. Residents also petitioned for the cancellation of previously-issued licences to sell liquor.

The economic downturn in the 1930s followed by restrictive measures throughout the Second World War resulted in the closure of numerous liquor stores and beer and wine stores. As well, measures such as reduced store hours and the Purchase Card and Beer Coupon initiatives addressed the Board's need to control liquor supply during the war years. After the war ended, stores reopened and restrictive measures were lifted by the end of 1947.

In 1950, new Board policy allowed for store premises to be owned by the Board. Previously, the Board only operated in premises that it leased. By 1953, over half of the liquor stores operating in the province were owned by the Board. In 1959, The Liquor Licensing Act (S.S. 1959, c. 19) was enacted, thus removing from the Board the responsibility for the issue and control of liquor licences. The Saskatchewan Liquor Licensing Commission, while a separate administrative body, continued to operate within the Board's organizational structure. In 1965, an amendment to The Liquor Act (R.S.S. 1965, c. 382) provided for the establishment of special liquor vendors (later more commonly referred to as franchises). This allowed for liquor to be sold by the bottle at licensed facilities other than Board-operated liquor stores, yet still be distributed and controlled by the Board.

From 1982 to 1989, the Board's organizational structure included a chairman, but also a general manager to oversee its administration and daily operations. On January 2, 1989, The Liquor Act and The Liquor Licensing Act were repealed and replaced with The Alcohol Control Act (S.S. 1988-89, c. A-18.01). As part of the new Act, one individual holding the title of chairman and chief executive officer was appointed to oversee the administration and operation of the Board, thus eliminating the general manager position. As well, changes to the Act's regulations allowed for additional liquor franchises in rural Saskatchewan, replacing larger Board stores with more cost-effective franchises.

The Saskatchewan Liquor Board ceased existence on July 1, 1993 when it amalgamated with the Saskatchewan Liquor Licensing Commission and the Saskatchewan Gaming Commission to form the Saskatchewan Liquor and Gaming Authority.

Saskatchewan. Dept. of Northern Saskatchewan. Social Services Branch

  • GA 151
  • Secondary Agency
  • 1974-1982

In the months following the establishment of the Department of Northern Saskatchewan (D.N.S.) in May 1972, responsibility for social services programs to the province's Northern Administration District was transferred from the Department of Social Services. A Social Services Division was organized under the Operations Branch of the D.N.S. during the 1972-1973 fiscal year. Regional offices were established at Uranium City, La Ronge, Buffalo Narrows and Creighton, and a temporary office was located at Meadow Lake. Program delivery in the areas of public assistance, child welfare and probation commenced. For the 1973-1974 fiscal year, a Social Services Division existed as part of the Health and Social Development Branch. Despite the change in organizational structure, there was no alteration to the programs and services offered. A permanent regional office at Green Lake replaced the temporary location at Meadow Lake.

By the 1974-1975 fiscal year, a Social Services Branch was established. For the duration of its existence, the branch focused on the program areas of public assistance; child and family welfare; corrections; community services. Programs and services continued to be delivered through the network of regional offices, which included a sixth office at La Loche by 1975.

Public assistance was offered through the Saskatchewan Assistance Plan and Old Age Social Security Assistance. Child and family welfare services included: child protection; foster homes and child care centres; adoption services; day care centres; assistance to unmarried mothers; and administration of putative father cases. Community recreation centres were established in 1974. Additional community services introduced by the branch included: the Services to the Elderly Program (by 1980 known as the Northern Home Care Program); the Employment Support Program; and rehabilitation programs for residents with alcohol dependency. Corrections initiatives included: probation supervision and programs; the supervision of parolees from federal institutions living in the north; a probation hostel located at Potato Lake; and community corrections centres at Besnard Lake and Buffalo Narrows which opened in 1981 and 1982, respectively.

The Social Services Branch existed until 1982, when responsibility for social services was transferred back to the Department of Social Services. The Department of Northern Saskatchewan was disestablished in 1984.

Saskatchewan. Dept. of Social Services. Family Services Division

  • GA 156
  • Secondary Agency
  • 1988-1992

Established in 1988, the Family Services Division of the Department of Social Services provided child, family and youth social services by authority of The Family Services Act. Programs and services were delivered through a network of twenty-three regional offices throughout the province. The division also oversaw provisions of service by non-governmental organizations that supplemented or complemented services provided by the department. The division reported to the Assistant Deputy Minister of the department.

Family services included child protection, teen parent and unmarried mother services, adoption, foster care, and family violence services. Child protection services investigated into all reports of child abuse or neglect. Subsequent measures included counselling, referral and supportive services or the removal of a child from the home. Teen parent and unmarried mother services provided information, referrals, counselling, and pre-natal and post-natal support services, as well as services for single mothers seeking to place children for adoption. Adoption services were responsible for the recruitment, screening, preparation and selection of adoptive families for children in need of placement, as well as facilitating private, step-parent, and international adoptions. The foster home program provided substitute family environments for children in need of temporary or permanent placement. Responsibility for children in foster care was shared between the department and the foster parents in the program. Family violence services were provided by departmental staff and by non-governmental organizations and included crisis accommodation, crisis intervention, counselling and family support.

Responsibilities of the Family Services Division, along with those of the Young Offenders Division, were amalgamated in 1992 to form the Family and Youth Services Division of the Department of Social Services.

Saskatchewan. Dept. of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation. Public Welfare Branch

  • GA 153
  • Secondary Agency
  • 1951-1954

The Public Welfare Branch of the Department of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation was established in 1951 by an amalgamation of the department's Child Welfare Branch and Public Assistance Branch. The new branch was comprised of three divisions: Child Welfare; Public Assistance; and Regional Services. Directors of the divisions were M.E. Battel, A.W. Shivon and R.S. Johnston, respectively.

The Child Welfare Division was responsible for the administration of The Child Welfare Act and The Education of Blind and Deaf Children Act. Programs provided by the division were child protection, support to unmarried mothers, the education of blind students, adoption services, foster care and institutional care for children not suitable for foster care. The division also worked in cooperation with the Children's Aid Societies of Saskatoon and Moose Jaw for the provision of child protection and foster care programs and services.

The Public Assistance Division was responsible for the administration of: The Old Age Assistance Act; The Blind Persons' Allowance Act; The Social Aid Act; The Deserted Wives' and Children's Maintenance Act, 1950; and The Mothers' Allowance Regulations. Programs provided by the division were social aid, aid to dependent families, old age assistance, disabled and blind persons' allowances, assistance to those under long-term hospital care, and deserted wives and children's assistance.

The Regional Services Division provided child welfare and public assistance services through a network of regional offices throughout the province. Regional offices were located at Regina, Saskatoon, North Battleford, Prince Albert, Moose Jaw and Yorkton. Regional sub-offices were located at Weyburn (for the Regina region), Melfort (Prince Albert region) and Swift Current (Moose Jaw region).

As a result of departmental reorganization in 1954, the Child Welfare, Public Assistance and Regional Services divisions became distinct branches within the department's organizational structure, and the Public Welfare Branch ceased existence. All of the former divisions' responsibilities were transferred to the respective new branches.

Saskatchewan. Dept. of Welfare. Child Welfare Branch

  • GA 155
  • Secondary Agency
  • 1965-1968

The Child Welfare Branch of the Department of Welfare was established in 1965 to provide programs and services that assisted children and families at risk. Its programs and services included: child protection; adoption; foster care; and assistance for unmarried parents. Programs and services were administered under The Child Welfare Act, and were provided through a network of regional offices throughout the province. The Director of the Child Welfare Branch was O.H. Driedger.

Child protection services addressed reports of child abuse or neglect in homes. Adoption services provided counselling and facilitated planning for the placement of children relinquished for adoption. Adoptions were administered through ward and non-ward agreements. In 1967, the Adoption of Indian and Métis (AIM) program was established to increase efforts in the adoption of First Nations and Métis children. Foster care was provided in situations of temporary or permanent removal of children from their families. Placements for these children included foster homes and children's institutions. Institutions operated by the branch included: Dales House and Kilburn Hall, temporary residences for children; and the Saskatchewan Boys' School, a temporary residence for delinquent boys. The branch also provided subsidies to private societies, religious groups and service clubs which provided residences for the temporary care of children. Services to unmarried mothers included financial assistance, and support in establishing paternity of the children in order to secure financial assistance from the fathers.

As a result of departmental reorganization in 1968, the planning and administration of child welfare programs became the responsibility of the department's Programs Division, while the delivery of child welfare client services became the responsibility of the Operations Division.

Saskatchewan. Dept. of Community Resources. Child and Family Services Division

  • GA 160
  • Secondary Agency
  • 2006-2007

The Child and Family Services Division of the Department of Community Resources was established on February 3, 2006. It was responsible for the administration of The Child and Family Services Amendment Act, 2003. The division reported to one of the department's Assistant Deputy Ministers, Shelley Whitehead. Its programs and services provided targeted support for at-risk children, youth and families. Program areas included: child protection and family support services; foster care provided by families throughout the province; adoption and the provision of post-adoption information; teen and young parent welfare; family violence intervention and counselling; and child nutrition education. The division also consulted with child and family services agencies from eighteen First Nations on the provision of child welfare services to families living on reserve.

The Child and Family Services Division was disestablished on November 21, 2007. Responsibilities of the division were transferred to the Child and Family Services Division of the Ministry of Social Services.

Resultaten 41 tot 50 van 7499