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Saskatchewan. Dept. of Social Services. Community and Personal Services Division

  • GA 130
  • Secondary Agency
  • 1979-1980

Established in 1979, the Community and Personal Services Division of the Department of Social Services provided services and programs to strengthen and support individual and family life in Saskatchewan. The division was organized into three branches: Core Services Branch; Home Care and Senior Citizens Branch; and Family and Community Services Branch.

The Core Services Branch was responsible for providing services to mentally challenged persons and for supporting the non-governmental organizations that offered complementary services. Community residential programs such as approved homes, group homes, training homes and semi-independent living settings offered care with an aim of clients functioning as independently as possible. The Community Resource Home and Outreach Program provided respite services to clients' families. The Valley View Centre in Moose Jaw and the North Park Centre in Prince Albert provided residential facilities for long-term care and programming. As well, the branch was responsible for the administration of activity centres and sheltered workshops throughout the province.

The Home Care and Senior Citizens Branch was organized into two sections: Senior Citizens and Home Care. The Senior Citizens Section was responsible for the planning and development of special-care homes, for the provision of subsidies to all residents of special-care homes, and for the licensing of low-income housing units for seniors. The section also established a Regulations Review Committee to review regulations pursuant to The Housing and Special-care Homes Act. The Home Care Section was responsible for the organization of district home care boards that provided home care service. Services delivered by the boards included nursing, homemaking, meals, home maintenance, and physical and occupational therapy. The section also coordinated with non-governmental agencies and senior care centres to provide services and to promote independence in seniors.

The Family and Community Services Branch was organized into three sections: Family and Youth Services Section; Day Care Section; and Community Services Section. The Family and Youth Services Section operated under the authority of The Family Services Act, The Unified Family Court Act, The Children of Unmarried Parents Act, and the federal Juvenile Delinquents Act. The section provided protection for children from families struggling to care for them in the form of counselling and foster care. Adoption services were provided through ward agreements and through the REACH (Resources for the Adoption of Children) program. Four child care facilities (Saskatchewan Boys' Centre, Roy Wilson Centre, Dales House, Kilburn Hall) along with several non-governmental agencies provided care for troubled youth. As well, the section provided juvenile offender services. The Day Care Section administered grants and monitored the standards of a variety of day care services throughout the province. The section encouraged involvement of parents in decision-making on the provision of services, and promoted public awareness about day care services. The Community Services Section administered grants and monitored the standards, financial operations and licenses of non-governmental social services organizations.

As a result of re-organization in 1980, child and youth services became the responsibility of the department's Regional Services Division, and seniors and home care services became the responsibility of the Continuing Care Division. All core services, day care and community services remained the responsibility of the Community and Personal Services Division.

Outlook School Unit No. 32, 1945-1978

  • LGA 46
  • Local Government
  • 1945-1978

Outlook School Unit No. 32 of Saskatchewan was established on August 27, 1945 pursuant to The Larger School Units Act (SS 1944, c.41). The Unit originally consisted of 106 rural and village public school districts, which were arranged in five subunits. On September 22, 1945, the Board of the Unit assumed office and took over the assets and liabilities of the school districts under its control. The Board was elected and consisted of five members (one for each of the subunits) who served two year terms. The Unit office was located in the town of Outlook, which is located approximately 90 kilometres southwest of Saskatoon.

The Board of the Outlook School Unit No. 32 was responsible for administering and managing each school district in the unit and for generally supervising and controlling each school. The Board provided buildings, equipment and supplies; hired qualified teachers; paid teachers their monthly salaries; and dealt with attendance, transportation and disciplinary issues. The Board was assisted by a secretary-treasurer, who managed the finances and kept minutes of Board meetings. The Superintendent of Schools for the Unit, appointed by the Minister of Education, was responsible for the general supervision of the schools and conferred with teachers and the Board on various issues.

In 1978, the Larger School Units Act was replaced by the Education Act (SS 1978). Outlook School Unit No. 32 became Outlook School Division No. 32 effective January 1, 1979.

Alberta and Saskatchewan Woman's Christian Temperance Union, 1886-1912

  • PA 446
  • Corporate
  • 1886-1912

The Woman's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) of the North-West Territories was a non-denominational woman's organization established in 1886, when Letitia Youmans, President of the Canadian WCTU., visited the Territories and organized Unions (local chapters) at Morley, Regina and Calgary. Mrs. W.W. Andrews of Qu'Appelle was named Superintendent of the North-West Territories in 1886 and went on to organize several additional Unions in 1887 including Qu'Appelle, Wolseley and Broadview. The first convention of the territorial Union was held in Calgary on October 5 and 6 , 1904. The organization was based on the belief that the abuse of alcohol was the cause of unemployment, disease, prostituion, poverty and immorality. The WCTU campaigned for legal prohibition of all alcoholic beverages and promoted sobriety, thrift, duty and family sanctity along with woman's suffrage and allowances for mothers.

In 1905, when Alberta and Saskatchewan became provinces, the Woman's Christian Temperance Union of the North-West Territories was renamed the Alberta and Saskatchewan Woman's Temperance Union. The officers of the Union included a president; vice-president; corresponding secretary; recording secretary; treasurer and secretary. Superintendents were responsible for the various departments, including organization; evangelistic work; purity and mother's meetings; and anti-narcotics. Officers and the superintendents of departments comprised the Executive Committee.

Local Unions in Saskatchewan included Abernethy; Arcola; Battleford; Carnduff; Cupar; Drinkwater; Estevan; Grenfell; Hanley; Indian Head; Manor; Maple Creek; Milestone; Moose Jaw; Oxbox; Prince Albert; Qu'Appelle; Radisson; Rouleau; Regina; Saltcoats; Saskatoon; Swift Current; Wapella; Yellow Grass; and Yorkton.

In 1912, the Alberta and Saskatchewan Union was split into two seperate provincial Unions: the Alberta Provincial Woman's Christian Temperance Union and the Saskatchewan Provincial Woman's Christian Temperance Union.

Saskatchewan. Judicial District of Gravelbourg

  • GA 74
  • Primary Agency
  • 1918-1932; 1936-1958

Judicial districts were geographical areas in Saskatchewan over which the courts held legal jurisdiction. Judicial boundaries pre- determined the centre where cases had to be heard. Criminal matters were usually heard in the judicial district where the crime occurred while civil matters were heard where the plaintiff or defendant resided or where the property in dispute was located.

In 1918, the boundaries of the judicial districts of Weyburn, Swift Current and Moose Jaw were altered, resulting in the establishment of the Judicial District of Gravelbourg on May 1, 1918 by order of the Lieutenant Governor in Council. The boundaries of the district were altered during its existence.

The Judicial District of Gravelbourg was located in the south-central part of the province, 125 kilometres from the city of Moose Jaw. The centre of the district was located in the town of Gravelbourg. The courthouse, constructed around 1926, was located at 209 Main Street.

Towns and villages located in the judicial district at some point during its existence were Aneroid; Coderre; Glentworth; Gravelbourg; Hazenmore; Hodgeville; Kincaid; Lafleche; Limerick; Malaval; Mankota; Mazenod; Meyronne; Ponteix; Shamrock; and Val Marie.

Courts holding jurisdiction in the district included the Court of King's Bench; the Court of Queen's Bench; the District Court; and the Surrogate Court. Both criminal and civil cases were heard in the judicial district. Criminal offences included arson; robbery; theft; murder; manslaughter; treason; kidnapping; assault; sexual assault; blackmail; extortion and perjury. Civil matters included divorce; contract disputes; foreclosures; the administration of estates of the deceased and probate of wills; small claims (debt) matters and property disputes.

A resident judge presided at the various court sittings. Court officials included a local registrar for the Court of King's Bench/Queen's Bench; a Clerk and Deputy Clerk of the District Court; a Clerk and Deputy Clerk of the Surrogate Court; a sheriff and deputy sheriff; court reporters and process issuers (servers). Local registrars processed court documents; received documents for filing; kept accounting records and acted as clerks of the court at all courtroom and chamber sessions. Sheriffs executed court orders; served legal documents and enforced statute orders.

The Judicial District of Gravelbourg was disestablished on June 1, 1932. All records were ordered to be transferred to the Judicial District of Assiniboia. The district was re-established on January 15, 1936.

In 1958, all existing judicial districts were abolished and the province of Saskatchewan became one judicial district with twenty-one judicial centres. The Judicial District of Gravelbourg became the Judicial Centre of Gravelbourg.

Saskatchewan. Supreme Court

  • GA 84
  • Primary Agency
  • 1907-1918

On September 1, 1905, the province of Saskatchewan was created. The court system that existed during the territorial period remained in place in the province until September 16, 1907, when The Judicature Act (S.S. 1907, c.8) came into effect. The act established a new court system consisting of the Supreme Court, the District Court and the Surrogate Court.

The Supreme Court consisted of a Chief Justice and four puisne judges who also served as ex officio justices of the peace and coroners for the province. Although the judges were required to reside in Regina, the seat of government for the province, every judge had jurisdiction throughout Saskatchewan and went on a trial circuit. Judges could preside over trials individually as well as sit en banc as an appeal court in Regina. In 1913, the Court was expanded to include the Chief Justice and five puisne judges and quorum for sitting en banc increased from three to four judges.

Members of the first Supreme Court were Justices E. L. Wetmore (Chief Justice); James Emile Pierre Preudergast; H.W. Newlands; T.C. Johnstone and J.Y. Lamont.

In 1907, the province was divided into eight judicial districts (Cannington, Moosomin, Yorkton, Regina, Moose Jaw, Saskatoon, Prince Albert and Battleford). By 1915 there were seventeen judicial districts. Criminal matters were usually heard in the judicial district where the crime occurred while civil matters were heard where the plaintiff or defendant resided or where the property in dispute was located. Court personnel, including local registrars, deputy registrars and process issuers, were appointed in each judicial district to provide assistance to the judges.

On March 1, 1918 the Supreme Court of Saskatchewan was abolished and the Court of King's Bench and the Court of Appeal were established.

Saskatchewan. Judicial District of Melville

  • GA 79
  • Primary Agency
  • 1913-1958

Judicial districts were geographical areas in Saskatchewan over which the courts held legal jurisdiction. Judicial boundaries pre- determined the centre where cases had to be heard. Criminal matters were usually heard in the judicial district where the crime occurred while civil matters were heard where the plaintiff or defendant resided or where the property in dispute was located.

In 1913, the boundaries of the Judicial Districts of Regina and Yorkton were altered, resulting in the establishment of the Judicial District of Melville on May 1, 1913. The boundaries of the district were altered several times during its existence.

The Judicial District of Melville was located in the east central part of the province. The centre of the district was located in the town of Melville. The Municipal Building served as the courthouse.

Towns and villages located in the judicial district at some point during its existence were Abernethy; Balcarres; Cupar; Dubuc; Dysart; Fort Qu'Appelle; Grayson; Hubbard; Ituna; Kelliher; Lebret; Lemberg; Leross; Lestock; Lipton; Melville; Neudorf; Spy Hill; and Yarbo.

Courts holding jurisdiction in the district included the Supreme Court; the Court of King's Bench; the Court of Queen's Bench; the District Court; and the Surrogate Court. Both criminal and civil cases were heard in the judicial district. Criminal offences included arson; robbery; theft; murder; manslaughter; treason; kidnapping; assault; sexual assault; blackmail; extortion and perjury. Civil matters included divorce; contract disputes; foreclosures; the administration of estates of the deceased and probate of wills; small claims (debt) matters and property disputes.

A resident judge presided at the various court sittings. Court officials included a Clerk of the Supreme Court; a local registrar for the Court of King's Bench/Queen's Bench; a Clerk and Deputy Clerk of the District Court; a Clerk and Deputy Clerk of the Surrogate Court; a sheriff and deputy sheriff; court reporters and process issuers (servers). Local registrars processed court documents; received documents for filing; kept accounting records and acted as clerks of the court at all courtroom and chamber sessions. Sheriffs executed court orders; served legal documents and enforced statute orders.

In 1958, all existing judicial districts were abolished and the province of Saskatchewan became one judicial district with twenty-one judicial centres. The Judicial District of Melville became the Judicial Centre of Melville.

Saskatchewan. Judicial District of Swift Current

  • GA 80
  • Primary Agency
  • 1913-1958

Judicial districts were geographical areas in Saskatchewan over which the courts held legal jurisdiction. Judicial boundaries pre-determined the centre where cases had to be heard. Criminal matters were usually heard in the judicial district where the crime occurred while civil matters were heard where the plaintiff or defendant resided or where the property in dispute was located.

In 1913, the boundaries of the Judicial District of Moose Jaw were altered, resulting in the establishment of the Judicial District of Swift Current on May 1, 1913. The boundaries of the district were altered several times during its existence.

The Judicial District of Swift Current was located in the south-west part of the province. The centre of the district was located in the city of Swift Current, 170 kilometres west of the city of Moose Jaw and 218 kilometres east of Medicine Hat, Alberta. The courthouse was located at 121 Lorne Street West.

Towns and villages located in the judicial district at some point during its existence were Aneroid; Cabri; Gull Lake; Herbert; Leader; Maple Creek; Morse; Ponteix; Prussia; Swift Current; Tompkins; and Woodrow.

Courts holding jurisdiction in the district included the Supreme Court; the Court of King's Bench; the Court of Queen's Bench; the District Court; and the Surrogate Court. Both criminal and civil cases were heard in the judicial district. Criminal offences included arson; robbery; theft; murder; manslaughter; treason; kidnapping; assault; sexual assault; blackmail; extortion and perjury. Civil matters included divorce; contract disputes; foreclosures; the administration of estates of the deceased and probate of wills; small claims (debt) matters and property disputes.

A resident judge presided at the various court sittings. Court officials included a Clerk of the Supreme Court; a local registrar for the Court of King's Bench/Queen's Bench; a Clerk and Deputy Clerk of the District Court; a Clerk and Deputy Clerk of the Surrogate Court; a sheriff and deputy sheriff; court reporters and process issuers (servers). Local registrars processed court documents; received documents for filing; kept accounting records and acted as clerks of the court at all courtroom and chamber sessions. Sheriffs executed court orders; served legal documents and enforced statute orders.

In 1958, all existing judicial districts were abolished and the province of Saskatchewan became one judicial district with twenty-one judicial centres. The Judicial District of Swift Current became the Judicial Centre of Swift Current.

Saskatchewan. Judicial District of Wilkie

  • GA 81
  • Primary Agency
  • 1922-1958

Judicial districts were geographical areas in Saskatchewan over which the courts held legal jurisdiction. Judicial boundaries pre-determined the centre where cases had to be heard. Criminal matters were usually heard in the judicial district where the crime occurred while civil matters were heard where the plaIntiff or defendant resided or where the property in dispute was located.

The Judicial District of Wilkie was established on May 1, 1922. The geographical area it occupied was previously known as the Judicial District of Scott. The boundaries of the Wilkie Judicial District were altered several times during its existence.

The Judicial District of Wilkie was located in the west central part of the province. The centre of the district was located in the town of Wilkie, 150 kilometres west of Saskatoon and 58 kilometres south of the Battlefords.

Towns and villages located in the judicial district at some point during its existence were Cando; Denzil; Landis; Macklin; Primate; Senlac; Scott; Unity and Wilkie.

Courts holding jurisdiction in the district included the Court of King's Bench; the Court of Queen's Bench; the District Court; and the Surrogate Court. Both criminal and civil cases were heard in the judicial district. Criminal offences included arson; robbery; theft; murder; manslaughter; treason; kidnapping; assault; sexual assault; blackmail; extortion and perjury. Civil matters included divorce; contract disputes; foreclosures; the administration of estates of the deceased and probate of wills; small claims (debt) matters and property disputes.

A resident judge presided at the various court sittings. Court officials included a local registrar for the Court of King's Bench/Queen's Bench; a Clerk and Deputy Clerk of the District Court; a Clerk and Deputy Clerk of the Surrogate Court; a sheriff and deputy sheriff; court reporters and process issuers (servers). Local registrars processed court documents; received documents for filing; kept accounting records and acted as clerks of the court at all courtroom and chamber sessions. Sheriffs executed court orders; served legal documents and enforced statute orders.

In 1958, all existing judicial districts were abolished and the province of Saskatchewan became one judicial district with twenty-one judicial centres. The Judicial District of Wilkie became the Judicial Centre of Wilkie.

Saskatchewan. Judicial District of Leader

  • GA 90
  • Primary Agency
  • 1923-1931

Judicial districts were geographical areas in Saskatchewan over which the courts held legal jurisdiction. Judicial boundaries pre-determined the centre where cases had to be heard. Criminal matters were usually heard in the judicial district where the crime occurred while civil matters were heard where the plaintiff or defendant resided or where the property in dispute was located.

In 1923, the boundaries of the Judicial District of Swift Current were altered, resulting in the establishment of the Judicial District of Leader on August 15, 1923. The Judicial District of Leader was located in the south-west part of the province near the Saskatchewan/Alberta border. The centre of the district was located in the town of Leader.

Towns and villages in the judicial district at some point during its existence were Abbey; Burstall; Fox Valley; Lancer; Leader; Portreeve; Prelate and Sceptre.

Courts holding jurisdiction in the judicial district included the Court of King's Bench; the District Court; and the Surrogate Court. Both criminal and civil cases were heard in the judicial district. Criminal offences included arson; robbery; theft; murder; manslaughter; treason; kidnapping; assault; sexual assault; blackmail; extortion and perjury. Civil matters included divorce; contract disputes; foreclosures; the administration of estates of the deceased and probate of wills; small claims (debt) matters and property disputes.

A resident judge presided at the various court sittings. Court officials included a local registrar for the Court of King's Bench; a Clerk and Deputy Clerk of the District Court; a Clerk and Deputy Clerk of the Surrogate Court; a sheriff and deputy sheriff; court reporters and process issuers (servers). Local registrars processed court documents; received documents for filing; kept accounting records and acted as clerks of the court at all courtroom and chamber sessions. Sheriffs executed court orders; served legal documents and enforced statute orders.

The Judicial District of Leader was disestablished on July 2, 1931. The area it occupied was absorbed by the judicial districts of Maple Creek, Swift Current and Kindersley.

Saskatchewan. Judicial District of Scott

  • GA 91
  • Primary Agency
  • 1913-1922

Judicial districts were geographical areas in Saskatchewan over which the courts held legal jurisdiction. Judicial boundaries pre-determined the centre where cases had to be heard. Criminal matters were usually heard in the judicial district where the crime occurred while civil matters were heard where the plaintiff or defendant resided or where the property in dispute was located.

In 1913, the boundaries of the judicial districts of Battleford and Saskatoon were altered, resulting in the establishment of the Judicial District of Scott. The Judicial District of Scott was located in the west-central part of the province. The centre of the district was located in the town of Scott.

Towns and villages in the judicial district at some point during its existence were Adanac; Biggar; Cando; Denzil; Landis; Macklin; Perdue; Primate; Salvador; Scott; Senlac; Unity; Vance and Wilkie.

Courts holding jurisdiction in the judicial district included the Supreme Court; the Court of King's Bench; the District Court; and the Surrogate Court. Both criminal and civil cases were heard in the judicial district. Criminal offences included arson; robbery; theft; murder; manslaughter; treason; kidnapping; assault; sexual assault; blackmail; extortion and perjury. Civil matters included divorce; contract disputes; foreclosures; the administration of estates of the deceased and probate of wills; small claims (debt) matters and property disputes.

A resident judge presided at the various court sittings. Court officials included a local registrar for the Court of King's Bench; a Clerk and Deputy Clerk of the District Court; a Clerk and Deputy Clerk of the Surrogate Court; a sheriff and deputy sheriff; court reporters and process issuers (servers). Local registrars processed court documents; received documents for filing; kept accounting records and acted as clerks of the court at all courtroom and chamber sessions. Sheriffs executed court orders; served legal documents and enforced statute orders.

On May 1, 1922, the Judicial District of Scott became the Judicial District of Wilkie.

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