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Authority record
Secondary Agency

Saskatchewan. Dept. of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation. Corrections Branch

  • GA 139
  • Secondary Agency
  • 1949-1965

The Corrections Branch of the Department of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation was established on April 1, 1949 in conjunction with the establishment of the department. All services and programs of the preceding Department of Welfare's Corrections Branch were continued under the new department. Directors of the branch included Hugh G. Christie (1949-1951), J.V Fornataro (1951-1958), J.R. Mather (1958-1964) and M.E. Rubin (1964-1965). The director reported to the department's Deputy Minister (1949-1958), then to the Director of Welfare (1958-1965).

Correctional institutions administered and operated by the branch included the provincial men's jails in Regina, Prince Albert and Moosomin (closed in 1949), the women's jail at Prince Albert, and the Industrial School for Boys in Regina (renamed Saskatchewan Boys' School in 1950). Responsibility for the Saskatchewan Boys' School was transferred to the department's Child Welfare Branch in 1959. Additional institutional, minimum-security work camps were established throughout the province in the 1950s.

Following the correctional model established by the Department of Welfare's Corrections Branch, continued emphasis was placed by the branch on rehabilitation programs and services for offenders. This included academic, vocational and physical training, as well as emotional and spiritual counselling from trained staff along with representatives from the John Howard Society, church groups and service clubs.

Divisions within the branch continued existence for adult parole and probation, and juvenile parole and probation. By 1952, services provided by the divisions were delivered by field staff of the Regional Services Division of the department's Public Welfare Branch. Legislation was passed in 1959 that directed the transfer of the care and treatment of juvenile delinquents to the Child Welfare Branch.

The Department of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation was discontinued on April 30, 1965. Services and programs of the Corrections Branch were continued under the Department of Welfare.

Saskatchewan. Dept. of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation. Public Assistance Branch, 1954-1965

  • GA 163
  • Secondary Agency
  • 1954-1965

The Public Assistance Branch of the Department of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation was established in 1954 as a result of departmental reorganization. The branch was responsible for the administration of: The Social Aid Act; The Old Age Assistance Act; The Blind Persons' Allowances Act; The Disabled Persons' Allowances Act, 1954; The Deserted Wives' and Children's Maintenance Act, 1950; and The Mothers' Allowance Regulations. Programs provided by the division were: social aid; supplemental allowances to old age security pensioners and blind persons; mothers' allowances; old age assistance; disabled and blind persons' allowances; and deserted wives and children's support.

The social aid program was administered jointly by the branch and by municipalities throughout Saskatchewan. Assistance was offered to clients based on a "needs test" evaluation system which ensured that clients were receiving assistance appropriate to their needs. In addition to the program's long-term financial assistance, short-term housing and access to health services were offered to transients. In Regina, Saskatoon and Prince Albert, the Salvation Army collaborated with the branch and the respective municipalities in the provision of these services. Supplemental allowances were offered through the branch to old age security pensioners and to blind persons who required additional financial assistance. Allowance programs were administered by the branch to mothers, blind and disabled persons and to residents 65 years or older. The allowances were typically a fixed amount offered to qualifying residents on a monthly basis. By 1962, the mothers' allowance program was changed to focus on dependent families. The branch also provided services to deserted wives and children by administrating maintenance orders for support of children where support or payments were not granted to the wives.

The Department of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation was discontinued on April 30, 1965 with the establishment of the Department of Welfare. Responsibility for public assistance programs and services was assumed by the Public Assistance Branch of the new department.

Saskatchewan. Dept. of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation. Public Welfare Branch

  • GA 153
  • Secondary Agency
  • 1951-1954

The Public Welfare Branch of the Department of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation was established in 1951 by an amalgamation of the department's Child Welfare Branch and Public Assistance Branch. The new branch was comprised of three divisions: Child Welfare; Public Assistance; and Regional Services. Directors of the divisions were M.E. Battel, A.W. Shivon and R.S. Johnston, respectively.

The Child Welfare Division was responsible for the administration of The Child Welfare Act and The Education of Blind and Deaf Children Act. Programs provided by the division were child protection, support to unmarried mothers, the education of blind students, adoption services, foster care and institutional care for children not suitable for foster care. The division also worked in cooperation with the Children's Aid Societies of Saskatoon and Moose Jaw for the provision of child protection and foster care programs and services.

The Public Assistance Division was responsible for the administration of: The Old Age Assistance Act; The Blind Persons' Allowance Act; The Social Aid Act; The Deserted Wives' and Children's Maintenance Act, 1950; and The Mothers' Allowance Regulations. Programs provided by the division were social aid, aid to dependent families, old age assistance, disabled and blind persons' allowances, assistance to those under long-term hospital care, and deserted wives and children's assistance.

The Regional Services Division provided child welfare and public assistance services through a network of regional offices throughout the province. Regional offices were located at Regina, Saskatoon, North Battleford, Prince Albert, Moose Jaw and Yorkton. Regional sub-offices were located at Weyburn (for the Regina region), Melfort (Prince Albert region) and Swift Current (Moose Jaw region).

As a result of departmental reorganization in 1954, the Child Welfare, Public Assistance and Regional Services divisions became distinct branches within the department's organizational structure, and the Public Welfare Branch ceased existence. All of the former divisions' responsibilities were transferred to the respective new branches.

Saskatchewan. Dept. of Social Welfare. Corrections Branch

  • GA 138
  • Secondary Agency
  • 1947-1949

The Corrections Branch of the Department of Social Welfare was established on April 1, 1947 when responsibility of the administration of provincial correctional institutions was transferred from the Department of Public Works. This transfer stemmed from recommendations made by the 1946 Saskatchewan Penal Commission. At its establishment, Hugh G. Christie was appointed as Director of Corrections and reported to the deputy minister of the department.

Correctional institutions operated and administered by the branch included the provincial men's jails at Regina, Prince Albert and Moosomin and the women's jail at Prince Albert. The branch also assumed operation of the Industrial School for Boys in Regina.

A key focus of the branch was to incorporate recommendations made by the Penal Commission to move away from a punitive approach to corrections to one emphasizing rehabilitation. This focus lead to the introduction of expanded vocational, physical and academic training opportunities for offenders, as well as spiritual and emotional counselling from staff psychologists and psychiatrists, and representatives from the John Howard Society, church groups and service clubs.

Adult probation and juvenile parole and probation divisions of the branch were established in 1948 and were located in Regina.

The Department of Social Welfare was discontinued on March 31, 1949. Programs and services of the Corrections Branch continued under the Department of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation.

Saskatchewan. Dept. of Supply and Services. Commercial Services Division

  • GA 120
  • Secondary Agency
  • 1983-1986

The Commercial Services Division of the Department of Supply and Services, which was managed by an executive director, originally consisted of the Transportation Services Branch, the Communication Services Branch, the Central Survey and Mapping Agency, and the Office Services Agency.

The functions and responsibilities of the division were centered on providing services to Saskatchewan government departments, agencies and Crown corporations. The division provided central photocopying services to offices where it was not feasible to have individual machines; produced the Saskatchewan Gazette and other statutory publications; provided land transportation through the acquisition and lease of vehicles; provided executive air, air ambulance and forest fire detection/suppression services; provided integrated telecommunication services; provided mapping and surveying services and operated a distribution centre for maps, photographs and survey information; offered photographic services that included a still photography library; and distributed and delivered all government mail.

During the 1986-87 fiscal year, the Commercial Services Division was reorganized into the Operations and Services Division.

Saskatchewan. Dept. of Welfare. Child Welfare Branch

  • GA 155
  • Secondary Agency
  • 1965-1968

The Child Welfare Branch of the Department of Welfare was established in 1965 to provide programs and services that assisted children and families at risk. Its programs and services included: child protection; adoption; foster care; and assistance for unmarried parents. Programs and services were administered under The Child Welfare Act, and were provided through a network of regional offices throughout the province. The Director of the Child Welfare Branch was O.H. Driedger.

Child protection services addressed reports of child abuse or neglect in homes. Adoption services provided counselling and facilitated planning for the placement of children relinquished for adoption. Adoptions were administered through ward and non-ward agreements. In 1967, the Adoption of Indian and Métis (AIM) program was established to increase efforts in the adoption of First Nations and Métis children. Foster care was provided in situations of temporary or permanent removal of children from their families. Placements for these children included foster homes and children's institutions. Institutions operated by the branch included: Dales House and Kilburn Hall, temporary residences for children; and the Saskatchewan Boys' School, a temporary residence for delinquent boys. The branch also provided subsidies to private societies, religious groups and service clubs which provided residences for the temporary care of children. Services to unmarried mothers included financial assistance, and support in establishing paternity of the children in order to secure financial assistance from the fathers.

As a result of departmental reorganization in 1968, the planning and administration of child welfare programs became the responsibility of the department's Programs Division, while the delivery of child welfare client services became the responsibility of the Operations Division.

Saskatchewan. Dept. of Welfare. Corrections Branch

  • GA 140
  • Secondary Agency
  • 1965-1968

The Corrections Branch of the Department of Welfare was established on May 1, 1965 in conjunction with the establishment of the department. All services and programs of the Department of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation's Corrections Branch were continued under the new department. The branch director, M.E. Rubin, reported to the department's Director of Welfare.

Correctional institutions administered and operated by the branch were located in Regina (men's) and Prince Albert (men's and women's). In addition, several minimum-security work camps were located throughout the province. Programs and services offered by the branch provided offenders with opportunities for academic, vocational and physical training, as well as emotional, spiritual and family counselling. Parole services were coordinated through the institutions in cooperation with the National Parole Board.

The Corrections Branch operated in conjunction with the department's Regional Services Branch in the delivery of probation services by field staff through a network of regional offices around the province.

As a result of departmental reorganization in 1968, the operation and administration of correctional institutions and work camps was transferred to the Institutions Branch. Probation services were transferred to the Operations Branch.

Saskatchewan. Dept. of Welfare. Institutions Branch

  • GA 141
  • Secondary Agency
  • 1968-1972

The Institutions Branch of the Department of Welfare was established in 1968 upon a reorganization of the department. As part of the reorganization all correctional, child care, geriatric and special-care institutions operated by the department were made the responsibility of the branch. The branch director, O.H. Driedger, reported to the Associate Deputy Minister (Operations).

Correctional institutions included men's centres in Regina and Prince Albert, and the Pine Grove women's centre in Prince Albert. Offenders at these facilities were: adults serving less than two years; were remanded while awaiting trial or sentencing; or were sentenced to a federal penitentiary but were awaiting decision from the Court of Appeal. As part of the operation of the institutions, the branch offered offenders various academic, physical and vocational training programs, as well as emotional, spiritual and family counselling.

Child welfare institutions provided care for delinquent and emotionally disturbed youth and those requiring emergency or short-term foster care. Saskatchewan Boys' School in Regina offered residence and programs to delinquent and socially maladjusted boys aged 12 to 15. The Roy Wilson Centre in Sedley provided similar services to girls aged 12 to 16. Dales House in Regina and Kilburn Hall in Saskatoon offered emergency and short-term foster care.

Geriatric and special-care institutions included the Provincial Geriatric Centres at Melfort (Parkland Hospital) and Swift Current (Palliser Hospital), and the Wolseley Centre (Lakeside Home) operated by the branch. As well, a network of small nursing homes and assisted-living units were financially supported, licensed and inspected by the branch.

The Institutions Branch ceased existence on May 12, 1972 when the Department of Welfare was discontinued. The operation of the department's institutions was continued under the Department of Social Services.

Saskatchewan. Dept. of Welfare. Operations Division

  • GA 149
  • Secondary Agency
  • 1968-1972

The Operations Division of the Department of Welfare was established in 1968 upon a reorganization of the department. As part of the reorganization, all public assistance, child welfare, corrections, geriatric care and emergency welfare programs and services delivered by the department were made the responsibility of the branch. Programs and services were offered through a network of eleven regions and at various institutions throughout the province. The division was headed by the department's Associate Deputy Minister (Operations), C.A. Westcott.

Public assistance was administered through the Saskatchewan Assistance Plan and other programs for citizens with financial need or disability. In addition to income support, the Saskatchewan Assistance Plan offered welfare services such as counselling, rehabilitation and preventative services to clients in need. As well, Regional Appeal Committees and Regional Advisory Boards, comprised of departmental staff and local citizens, addressed grievances raised by clients about their applications for assistance.

Child welfare programs and services assisted disadvantaged children and families. Child protection services addressed reports of child abuse or neglect in homes. Foster care was provided in situations of temporary or permanent removal of children from their families. Placements for these children included foster homes and children's institutions. Adoption services provided counselling and facilitated planning for the placement of children relinquished for adoption. Adoptions were administered through ward and non-ward agreements, and through programs such as the AIM (Adopt Indian and Métis) program. Services to unmarried mothers included financial assistance, health care, maternity home care, counselling and training. Cases of juvenile offenders were administered in accordance with the federal Juvenile Delinquents Act.

Corrections programs, including adult probation and parole services, were provided through the provincial correctional institutions and from the various regional offices. Geriatric services and programs were provided to the aged and infirm at two geriatric centres and a nursing home. Emergency welfare services were available for response and relief after natural and man-made disasters.

The Operations Division ceased existence on May 12, 1972 when the Department of Welfare was discontinued. The operation of the department's programs and services was continued under the Social Services Division of the Department of Social Services.

Saskatchewan. Dept. of Welfare. Public Assistance Branch

  • GA 164
  • Secondary Agency
  • 1965-1968

The Public Assistance Branch of the Department of Welfare was established in 1965. The branch was responsible for the administration of: The Social Aid Act (replaced by The Saskatchewan Assistance Act, 1966); The Old Age Assistance Act; The Blind Persons' Allowances Act; The Disabled Persons' Allowances Act; and The Deserted Wives' and Children's Maintenance Act. At its establishment, programs provided by the division were: social aid; supplemental allowances to old age security pensioners and blind persons; dependent families allowances; old age assistance; disabled and blind persons' allowances; and deserted wives and children's support.

On April 1, 1966, the Saskatchewan Assistance Plan (SAP) was introduced under authority of the new Saskatchewan Assistance Act, 1966 and the Saskatchewan Assistance Regulations. The SAP replaced the former social aid program and assumed responsibility for the former allowance programs. This, coupled with changes to federal public assistance programs, allowed the branch to streamline public assistance into a single program for the provision of assistance for all persons in need. Funding for the SAP continued to be provided by the federal, provincial and municipal governments, with the SAP assuming responsibility for the administration of public assistance from municipalities in the province. Legislation, however, allowed for qualified municipalities to continue the administration of the assistance programs. The Cities of Moose Jaw and Prince Albert (and their related Rural Municipalities) chose to administer their own programs. In locations where municipalities did not participate, the program was administered from regional offices throughout the province. The SAP aimed at providing a more holistic approach to assisting residents in need by providing medical, psychological and vocational assessments and counselling to recipients and members of their families in addition to financial assistance.

In accordance with Section 17 of The Saskatchewan Assistance Act, the Provincial-Municipal Advisory Board was appointed in the 1966-1967 fiscal year. It was comprised of the deputy minister of the Department of Welfare, the director of the Public Assistance Branch, three representatives each of the Saskatchewan Association of Rural Municipalities and the Saskatchewan Urban Municipalities Association, one representative each from the Departments of Public Health and Municipal Affairs and a community representative. The Board advised on issues related to the Saskatchewan Assistance Plan, including the distribution of public assistance funds to the Plan's recipients. Local appeal committees were also established to adjudicate appeals of dissatisfied SAP recipients.

As a result of departmental reorganization in 1968, the planning and administration of public assistance programs became the responsibility of the department's Programs Division, while the delivery of the Saskatchewan Assistance Plan became the responsibility of the Operations Division.

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