Showing 127 results

Authority record
Primary Agency

Saskatchewan. Court of King's Bench

  • GA 85
  • Primary Agency
  • 1918-1952

On March 1, 1918 the Supreme Court of Saskatchewan was abolished and two new courts were created. The Court of King's Bench was assigned the trial function and the Court of Appeal assumed the appellate function. Although the statutory provision for the two new courts was made in 1915, the legislation was not proclaimed by the Lieutenant Governor-in-Council until 1918.

The Court of King's Bench originally consisted of a chief justice and five other judges appointed by the Governor General-in-Council. The judges had equal power, authority and jurisdiction and were ex officio justices of the peace and coroners for the province. The court had jurisdiction over certiorari proceedings, relief against forfeiture for breach of covenant, lunatics and their property, alimony, and criminal conversation, etc. Some cases, such as murder, attempted murder, manslaughter, rape, attempted rape, divorce and treason were heard exclusively in King's Bench. The court also heard civil cases involving larger amounts of money.

The judges had jurisdiction throughout the province and although they sat mainly in Regina, they were required to make regularly scheduled circuits to the various judicial districts in the province. In 1920, there were twenty judicial districts. Criminal matters were usually heard in the judicial district where the crime occurred while civil matters were heard where the plaintiff or defendant resided or where the property in dispute was located. Court personnel, including sheriffs, local registrars, deputy registrars and process issuers, were appointed in each judicial district to provide assistance to the judges.

In 1952, the ascension of Queen Elizabeth led to the renaming of the Court as the Court of Queen's Bench.

Saskatchewan. Dept. of Advanced Education and Manpower

  • GA 11
  • Primary Agency
  • 1983-1987

The legislation creating the Department of Advanced Education and Manpower was assented to on April 29, 1983. The new department integrated functions previously delivered by the Departments of Continuing Education, Labour, Industry and Commerce, and Culture and Youth. On May 5, 1983, the Department of Continuing Education was absorbed into the new department.

The new department's responsibilities included the coordination of federal-provincial cost-shared occupational training programs, such as Adult Basic Education and Vocational Rehabilitation of Disabled Persons; the registration of private vocational schools in the province; the administration of federal and provincial loan, scholarship and bursary programs; and the administration of grant payments to universities, community colleges, and other post-secondary institutions and agencies.

The department was also responsible for programs and services related to job placement, labour market research, vocational guidance, employment counselling and the apprenticeship and trade certification programs.

Many of the department's programs and services were aimed at increasing the employability of individuals and groups underrepresented in the labour market, such as women, youth, aboriginals, people with mental and physical handicaps, and residents of Northern Saskatchewan.

The department was presided over by a Minister and Deputy Minister and was originally organized into four divisions: Advanced Education; Manpower; Planning and Evaluation and Administrative and Financial Services. There was also a University Affairs Branch and Communications Branch.

The Advanced Education Division originally had four branches: Program Development and Standards; Occupational Training; Community Colleges and Northern. The division was also responsible for the Saskatchewan Skills Extension Program, technical institutes, and vocational centres. In August, 1984 the Institute Operations Branch was established to support and co-ordinate the delivery of technical/vocational training in the province. During the 1985-1986 year, the division assumed the responsibilities of the Apprenticeship and Trade Certification Branch and the Northern Branch became an independent division with responsibility for occupational training, financial services, program development, and funding for three northern community colleges.

The Manpower Division originally consisted of six branches: Labour Market Planning and Information; Apprenticeship and Trade Certification; Career Services; Native Services; Youth Services and Women's Services. During the 1983-1984 year, Career Services was transferred to the Community Colleges Branch. In 1984-1985, Labour Market Planning and Information moved to the Planning and Evaluation Division. The Apprenticeship and Trade Certification Branch moved to the Advanced Education Division in 1985-1986. The Manpower Division was transferred out of the department and to the Employment Development Agency in December, 1985 while the Women's Services Branch became part of the Women's Secretariat in April, 1986.

The Planning and Evaluation Division originally consisted of three branches; Policy, Planning and Evaluation; Management Information Systems and Human Resources. The Division was responsible for strategic planning, policy formulation, program evaluation, budgeting, management information systems and human resource development. During 1984-1985, the Management Information Systems Branch became the Information Resources Management Services Branch and the Labour Market Planning and Information Branch was created. The Human Resources Branch became an independent division through an amalgamation of personnel services for the Departments of Advanced Education and Manpower, Education and the Saskatchewan Library.

The Administrative and Financial Services Division originally included the following branches: Administrative Services; Financial Planning and Student Financial Services. The branches were responsible for departmental budget preparation, office services, and administering grant payments and financial assistance programs.

The University Affairs Branch assumed the responsibilities of the Saskatchewan Universities Commission in August, 1983. The branch was responsible for the financing and overall development of the University of Regina, the University of Saskatchewan and all federated and affiliated colleges.

The Communications Branch promoted departmental activities and informed the general public, news media, and other organizations and individuals of the department's programs and policies through news releases, annual reports, speeches, audio/visual materials and paid advertising.

Significant movement of programs within branches occurred during the department's existence.

On April 1, 1987, the Department of Advanced Education and Manpower was combined with the Department of Education and the Saskatchewan Library to form one department with responsibility for K-12 education, all post secondary education and training through the universities, technical institutes and community colleges and coordination of all libraries in the province.

Saskatchewan. Dept. of Agriculture

  • GA 38
  • Primary Agency
  • 1905-1989

The Department of Agriculture was one of the original departments created upon the formation of the Executive Council of the North-West Territories in 1897. The department was headed by a Commissioner and a Deputy Commissioner. With the transfer to a provincial government in 1905, the department (still under a Commissioner and Deputy Commissioner) was organized into: the Fairs and Institutes Branch; Weeds and Seeds Branch; Dairying; Bacteriologist; Public Health Officer; and Brand Recorder. A Bureau of Information and Statistics was also added.

The Department of Agriculture's original responsibilities included dealing with brands, stray animals, pounds, stock and hide inspection, control of predatory animals, noxious weeds, prairie fires and protection of game, as well as encouraging development and providing assistance to farmers. The department also compiled production statistics and meteorological data. In addition, under the 1906 Department of Agriculture Act, the department was responsible for matters relating to immigration, vital statistics and public health, including hospitals.

The titles of Commissioner and Deputy Commissioner were superseded by Minister and Deputy Minister respectively, in 1909.

Other functions held by the Department of Agriculture in its early years included: a Bureau of Labour to look after the inspection of factories, ensure fair wages and work safety, and coordinate harvest help; responsibility for museums; and responsibility for debt assistance.

During its existence, the Department of Agriculture experienced numerous re-organizations and continual name changes to its branches and divisions. However, with a few important additions and deletions of responsibilities, most of the department's functions continued throughout its life span.

In 1910, the public health and hospitals function was transferred out of the Department of Agriculture. Also in 1910, members from the Department of Agriculture were appointed to the newly-organized Faculty of Agriculture at the University of Saskatchewan. The function of the Fairs and Institute Branch was transferred to the university level, under the supervision of the Department of (Agricultural) Extension. The Director of Agricultural Extension, appointed to the College of Agriculture, reported to the Deputy Minister on the work of agricultural societies.

A major function was added to the department with the creation of the Co-operative Organization Branch in 1913. The branch, developed out of the Office of the Registrar of Co-operative Associations, was established to assist farmers with marketing. It was renamed Co-operation and Markets Branch in 1920 and eventually formed as a separate Department of Co-operation and Co-operative Development in 1945.

The Vital Statistics function was transferred out of the department in 1914. However, added that year was the appointment of Agricultural Representatives. These Representatives provided advice and assistance to producers in various districts within the province. Initially, the Representatives acted as administrative support for the College of Agriculture, but later carried out their own programming. The Agricultural Representative Service became a branch in 1945 and was renamed Agricultural Extension Branch in 1969 to better reflect its function.

Another change to the department in 1914 was the inclusion of a Debtors Relief organization. This function was complemented in 1923 by the addition of the Debt Adjustment Bureau. This function of debt management was removed in 1935. The responsibility for museums was added in 1915, but was transferred to the Department of Railways, Labour and Industries in early 1928.

Early in its existence, the Department of Agriculture included a Bureau of Labour to look after the inspection of factories, ensure fair wages and work safety, and coordinate harvest help. This function continued until 1920 when the Bureau, then named the Bureau of Labour and Industries, no longer reported through the department.

By 1930, the department consisted of: the Debt Adjustment Bureau; Statistics Branch; Field Crop Branch; Dairy Branch; Livestock Branch; Bee Division (added in 1928 and later known as Apiary Branch); Co-operation and Markets Branch; and the Agricultural Representative Service.

As a result of drought and soil drifting in the early 1930s, the Land Utilization Branch was established in 1936 to carry out the work of the Land Utilization Board (1936-1964). The Board was responsible for establishing community pastures, irrigable land areas under the federal Prairie Farm Rehabilitation Act (PFRA), and for relocation of settlers.

By 1940, the duties of the Department of Agriculture were solely related to agriculture. The department was responsible for: the administration of all acts relating to agriculture; the promotion of agricultural interests in the province; encouraging production and facilitating the marketing of field and garden crops, livestock and livestock products; promoting and encouraging co-operation among agriculturalists; instituting inquiries and collecting facts and statistics relating to agriculture or other interests of Saskatchewan; and, issuing agricultural information through reports, statistics, circulars or other publications.

The Lands Utilization Board was transferred to the Department of Natural Resources and Industrial Development in 1945, but this responsibility came back to the Department of Agriculture in 1947. At this time, the Lands Utilization division was placed under the Lands Branch which was responsible for the administration of Crown lands in the province. Lands Branch had also been transferred from Natural Resources to Agriculture in legislation assented to on March 5, 1947. In 1964, the Land Utilization Board was replaced by the Agricultural Development Advisory Board.

The Conservation and Development Branch was established in 1949 to encourage and assist with better land use practices. The branch consisted of three main divisions: Operations; Water Development; and Water Rights.

A reorganization of the Department of Agriculture into five main branches was completed in 1951: Animal Industry; Agricultural Representative Service; Conservation and Development; Lands; and Plant Industry. The divisions of Statistics, Information and Radio, Records and General Office reported directly to the Deputy Minister and were sometimes referred to as the Administration Branch.

In 1958, the Agricultural Machinery Administration was added to the department to do the work of the Agricultural Machinery Board, established that same year. Its functions included investigation of complaints, testing machinery and publishing reports on farm machinery and test results.

The Family Farm Improvement Branch was created in 1960 to assist with the installation of farm water and sewage systems, and to assist with the relocation of farmsteads through grants.

The year 1973 witnessed another major restructuring of the department. The various branches, boards and agencies were organized under four major divisions: Extension and Rural Development Division; Farm Resources Development Division; Production and Marketing Division; and a Planning and Research Secretariat. This structure remained in place until 1980, when only the Extension and Rural Development Division and a Marketing and Economics Division were maintained.

Beginning in the late 1970's, the number of boards, commissions and agencies reporting through the department increased. The following are the agencies listed on the Department of Agriculture's organizational charts in annual reports for the period 1977 to 1989: Saskatchewan FarmStart Corporation (1973-1984); Saskatchewan Farm Ownership Board (1974-1992); Saskatchewan Land Bank Commission (1972-1981?); Agricultural Implements Board (1973-1984?); Saskatchewan Crop Insurance Board (1960-1984); Milk Control Board (1977?- ); Saskatchewan Hog Marketing Commission (1977?-1982?); Saskatchewan Sheep and Wool Marketing Commission (1973- ); Agricultural Development Corporation (1974-1990); Lands Appeal Board (1978?-1979); Saskatchewan Lands Allocation Appeal Board (1979?- ); Prairie Agricultural Machinery Institute (1978?- ); Natural Products Marketing Council (1979?- ); Saskatchewan Vegetable Marketing Commission (1981?- ); Agricultural Credit Corporation (1984-1993); Saskatchewan Beef Stabilization Board (1982-1990); Saskatchewan Horse Racing Commission (1983-1994); Saskatchewan Pork Producers' Marketing Board (1983?- ); Farm Land Security Board (1984? - 1987 Transferred to the Dept. of Justice).

Beginning in 1978, the Department of Agriculture began using the name Saskatchewan Agriculture, although both forms of the name appear in the department's annual reports in this period. Lands Branch was transferred to Saskatchewan Rural Development effective August 1, 1988.

In 1989, the Department of Agriculture was renamed the Department of Agriculture and Food to reflect the addition of new functions relating to diversification and value-added opportunities in the agri-foods industry. From March 2002 to May 2004, the department was known as the Department of Agriculture, Food and Rural Revitalization, after which it reverted to the Department of Agriculture and Food. As part of a government-wide rebranding strategy, the department was renamed the Ministry of Agriculture on November 21, 2007 [The Government Organization Act (S.S. 2007 c.6)]. It continues (2011) to be known as the Ministry of Agriculture.

Saskatchewan. Dept. of Agriculture and Food

  • GA 49
  • Primary Agency
  • 1989-2002, 2004-2007

The Department of Agriculture became the Department of Agriculture and Food on April 1, 1989.

The organizational structure for the department during 1989-1990 consisted of a Minister of Agriculture and Food and an Associate Minister. A Deputy Minister (DM) reported to the Minister. An Assistant Deputy Minister (ADM) reported to the Deputy Minister with the various branches and some agencies reporting to the ADM. The balance of the agencies reported through the DM.

The first minister of the department was Grant Devine. He had been the Minister of Agriculture prior to the reorganization. Perhaps due to Devine concurrently serving as premier, Harold Martens was appointed as Associate Minister of Agriculture and Food in October 1989. The associate position disappeared from departmental org charts in the 1991-1992 fiscal year, presumably as a result of Roy Romanow's NDP government replacing Devine's Progressive Conservative administration. Stuart Kramer was the first Deputy Minister.

The administrative structure evident in the annual report issued at end of the first fiscal year under Agriculture and Food comprised:
Administrative Services Branch - provided department support services in budgeting, accounting, space and accommodation, equipment and supplies, mail services, vehicle management, computer management, legislation and administrative analysis.
Agriculture Development and Diversification Secretariat - worked with individuals, companies, industry groups, and various levels of government to facilitate agri-food development and diversification initiatives.
Agricultural Engineering - developed and implemented policies, programs and services, and assists in the development of innovative and practical solutions to agricultural engineering problems.
Communications - disseminated information relating to programs, policies and services provided by Saskatchewan Agriculture and Food to the public through a variety of methods including library, publications production and distribution, audio-visual production and media relations.
Counselling and Assistance for Farmers - provided financial counseling and operating and/or consolidation loan guarantees to eligible farmers who had been declined operating loans from their primary lending institution.
Economics - had as its mission to strengthen the primary agricultural and food processing sectors of the provincial agri-food industry through the provision of economic research, analysis and program delivery.
Human Resources - provided the Department of Agriculture and Food, as well as the Extension Service, Rural Service and Lands branches with staffing, classification, staff relations, benefits administration, training and staff development. The branch also provided policy direction and guidance for administration and management of personnel to the Department and its associated agencies.
Livestock - developed programs and policies and administered regulations to encourage a viable competitive livestock and livestock products industry in the province.
Northern Farms Unit - operated farms at several locations in Northern Saskatchewan including Cumberland House, Ile-la-Crosse, and Silver Lake.
Soils and Crops - provided support to farmers through its Crop Technology and Development Section, Horticulture Section, Apiary Section, Soils Section and a unit responsible for the Agriculture and Food in Northern Saskatchewan program.
Veterinary Branch - provided support services for the veterinary profession in Saskatchewan in respect to issues of animal health and meat safety.

A Number of other agencies had a functional responsibility to the Minister, reporting through the Deputy Minister: Agricultural Credit Corporation; Milk Control Board; Natural Products Marketing Council; Prairie Agricultural Machinery Institute; Sask. Beef Stabilization Board; Saskatchewan Grain Car Corporation; Saskatchewan Horse Racing Commission; Saskatchewan Land Allocation Appeal Board; Saskatchewan Pork Producers' Marketing Board; Saskatchewan Sheep and Wool Marketing Commission; Saskatchewan Vegetable Marketing Commission.

By December 1989, all farms operated by the Northern Farms Unit had been either transferred to private operators or local trusts. The unit was included under the Administrative Services Branch in the departmental annual report for 1989-1990.

The Saskatchewan Agricultural Development Fund was created in 1985 to promote market expansion, diversification, biotechnology and value added production but was not reported as a separate agency until 1991-1992.

In 1992-1993, the Livestock, Soils and Crops, Veterinary and Environment and Engineering branches as well as the agencies Counselling and Assistance for Farmers, the Milk Control Board and the Prairie Agricultural Machinery Institute all began reporting through the Assistant Deputy Minister.

The fiscal year 1993-1994 saw the addition of a second ADM, one responsible for Policy and Planning and the other for Financial Support and Program Management. Lands and Registration Management was transferred to the latter. Lands Branch, formerly falling under the auspices of the Department of Rural Development was moved to Lands and Registration Management as the functions of Rural Development were distributed among other departments.

The next big change came in 1996-1997, when programs were juggled, with the resulting Programs and Services Division and the Development and Finance Division both reporting through their respective ADM and the Central Support Division reporting directly to the Deputy Minister.

In 1997-1998, the Saskatchewan Crop Insurance Corporation (SCIC) and the Agricultural Credit Corporation of Saskatchewan (ACS) were spun off as separate Crown corporations reporting directly to the deputy minister.

In 1999-2000, SCIC and ACS began reporting through the Assistant Deputy Minister responsible for the Programs and Services Division. In 1996, a slow phase-out of the ACS had been originally announced. It finally wound up 2001 and remaining staff were transferred to other positions within the department.

In the 2001-2002 fiscal year, the departmental functions split into four divisions from three - Programs and Services Division, Central Support Division, a new Policy and Financial Services Division which drew some functions from Central Support Division, and the Agricultural Development Division.

Note: While the name change was adopted for all purposes in 1989, the name of the department does not seem to have changed through legislation until the passage of The Department of Agriculture Amendment Act (S.S. 2000, c.40). The act was assented to June 27, 2000.

On March 26, 2002, the department merged with the Rural Revitalization Office and became the Dept. of Agriculture, Food and Rural Revitalization. [The Department of Agriculture and Food Amendment Act, (S.S. 2002, c.17)] Several functions were transferred to other areas of government. On May 6, 2004, the department's name reverted back to the Department of Agriculture and Food, and was such until November 21, 2007 when it was named the Ministry of Agriculture [The Government Organization Act (S.S. 2007 c.6)]. It continues (2010) to be known as the Ministry of Agriculture.

Saskatchewan. Dept. of Agriculture, Food and Rural Revitalization

  • GA 102
  • Primary Agency
  • 2002-2004

The Department of Agriculture, Food and Rural Revitalization was established on March 26, 2002 with the merger of the Department of Agriculture and Food and the Rural Revitalization Office. Within the newly-merged department, the Rural Issues Office was created to handle the responsibilities transferred from the Rural Revitalization Office.

Reporting to its Minister and Deputy Minister, the Department of Agriculture, Food and Rural Revitalization was composed of four major divisions: Programs and Services; Central Support; Agricultural Development; and Policy and Financial Services. Each division, with the exception of Central Support, was the responsibility of an Assistant Deputy Minister. Branches within the Programs and Services Division included Lands; Inspection and Regulatory Management; and Rural Issues. The Central Support Division was initially responsible for the department's communications; administrative services; and human resources and by 2003, communications and corporate services. Branches within the Agricultural Development Division included Agricultural Research; Crop Development; Extension Services (2002-2003 only); Agri-Business Development (2003-2004); Livestock Development; Food Safety and Regulation; and Market Development and Food. The Policy and Financial Services Division oversaw the Financial Programs Branch; Policy Branch; and the Saskatchewan Crop Insurance Corporation.

In addition to the Saskatchewan Crop Insurance Corporation, agencies with legislative responsibilities to the department included Agricultural Credit Corporation of Saskatchewan; Agricultural Implements Board; Agricultural and Food Products Development and Marketing Council; Agri-Food Innovation Fund; Beef Development Board; Irrigation Crop Diversification Corporation; Milk Control Board; Prairie Agricultural Machinery Institute; Saskatchewan Agricultural Stabilization Fund; and Crop Reinsurance Fund of Saskatchewan.

The department also maintained or established several committees, boards, commissions, and advisory councils to discuss and address concerns related to specific areas of agriculture, food production, animal health issues, commodity development, and the rural economy. These bodies, which involved representatives from government and the agriculture industry, included the Action Committee on the Rural Economy; Pork Industry Advisory Board; Livestock Loan Guarantee Program Producer Advisory Committee; Agriculture Development Fund Board; Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Advisory Council; Farm Support Review Committee; Saskatchewan Agri-Environmental Advisory Council; and various commodity-specific boards and commissions. As well, the department engaged in consultations with provincial and national organizations related to agriculture, agri-business and rural economic development.

The department's head office was located in Regina, with smaller offices located throughout the province. These locations provided services offered by Lands Branch offices; field offices; and offices of the Saskatchewan Crop Insurance Corporation. In the 2004-2005 fiscal year, the number of these locations was reduced from thirty-three to twenty-five, and the department established the Agriculture Knowledge Centre in Moose Jaw, and nine Agriculture Business Centres throughout the province.

In accordance with Order in Council 288/2004, the Department of Agriculture, Food and Rural Revitalization ceased existence on May 6, 2004. The Department of Rural Revitalization was created and the Department of Agriculture and Food was reestablished.

Saskatchewan. Dept. of Community Resources

  • GA 159
  • Primary Agency
  • 2006-2007

The Department of Community Resources was established on February 3, 2006 as a result of government reorganization. At its establishment, the department was organized into four program divisions: Income Assistance; Community Living; Housing; and Child and Family Services. Additionally, the department had several corporate services branches and hosted the Office of Disability Issues. Programs and services of the department were delivered through a network of five regional offices and service centres located in twenty-two communities throughout Saskatchewan. Deputy Ministers of the department were Wynne Young (Feb. to Apr. 2006) and Duncan Fisher (Apr. 2006-2007).

The Income Assistance Division was responsible for providing programs and services to residents of the province in financial need. Programs included: the Saskatchewan Employment Supplement; the Transitional Employment Allowance; Family Health Benefits; and the Saskatchewan Assistance Plan. As well, it provided subsidies for rental housing, child care and bus fares.

The Community Living Division was responsible for programs and services that supported the development of inclusive communities for individuals with intellectual disabilities. Services were provided to individuals and their families through a system of community-based social, residential and early childhood programs and by community service workers. The division also operated Valley View Centre, a long-term residence and care facility located in Moose Jaw. Additionally, the division worked cooperatively with non-governmental organizations including the Saskatchewan Association of Rehabilitation Centres and the Saskatchewan Association for Community Living in the delivery of its programs and services.

The Housing Division supported affordable housing initiatives for low- and moderate-income families in the province. It oversaw the housing resources of the Saskatchewan Housing Corporation, a Crown corporation, which managed agreements for housing with housing authorities and cooperatives, non-profit agencies and private landlords throughout the province. As well, the division administered programs to assist in the housing needs of low-income, elderly and disabled residents. The programs included: the Centenary Affordable Housing Program; the Saskatchewan Assisted Living Services program; the Saskatchewan Home Adaptations for Independence Program; and the Residential Rehabilitation Assistance Program.

The Child and Family Services Division was responsible for the administration of The Child and Family Services Amendment Act, 2003. Its programs and services supported child protection, foster care, adoption and post-adoption care, teen and young parent welfare, family violence intervention and counselling, and child nutrition and development. The division also consulted with child and family services agencies from eighteen First Nations on the provision of child welfare services to families living on reserve.

Corporate services supported program and service implementation within the department. They were comprised of: the Human Resources Division; Intergovernmental Relations Branch; Communications and Public Education Branch; Strategic Policy Branch; Research and Evaluation Branch; Information Technology Services Division; and Financial Management Division.

The Department of Community Resources was disestablished on November 21, 2007 and all of its responsibilities were transferred to the Ministry of Social Services.

Saskatchewan. Dept. of Community Resources and Employment

  • GA 157
  • Primary Agency
  • 2003-2006

The Department of Community Resources and Employment was established on April 1, 2003 when it was renamed from the former Department of Social Services by regulations of The Government Organization Act. At its establishment, the department was organized into four program divisions: Employment and Income Assistance; Community Living; Housing; and Child and Family Services. Additionally, the department had several corporate services branches and hosted the Office of Disability Issues. Programs and services of the department were delivered through a network of five regional offices and service centres located in twenty-two communities throughout Saskatchewan. Deputy Ministers of the department were Bonnie Durnford (2003-2004) and Wynne Young (2004-2006).

The Employment and Income Assistance Division was responsible for providing employment-related and financial services to residents of the province. Programs such as the Saskatchewan Assistance Plan (SAP), the Transitional Employment Allowance, and the Saskatchewan Employment Supplement provided income support. Further income support programs such as The Saskatchewan Child Benefit and Family Health Benefits provided assistance to low-income families, while the Saskatchewan Income Plan assisted low-income seniors. Career and employment services offered by the division included: career planning; information on job availability; skills training; and work experience programs. The division was also responsible for the Child Care Branch (by 2006, renamed the Early Learning and Child Care Branch) which administered licences to day care facilities and provided subsidies to low-income families requiring day care services.

The Community Living Division was responsible for programs and services that supported the development of inclusive communities for individuals with intellectual disabilities. Services were provided to individuals and their families through a system of community-based social, residential and early childhood programs and by community service workers. The division also operated Valley View Centre, a long-term residence and care facility located in Moose Jaw. Additionally, the division worked cooperatively with non-governmental organizations including the Saskatchewan Association of Rehabilitation Centres and the Saskatchewan Association for Community Living in the delivery of its programs and services.

The Housing Division supported affordable housing initiatives for low- and moderate-income families in the province. It oversaw the housing resources of the Saskatchewan Housing Corporation, a Crown corporation, which managed agreements for housing with housing authorities and cooperatives, non-profit agencies and private landlords throughout the province.

The Child and Family Services Division was responsible for the administration of The Child and Family Services Amendment Act, 2003. Its programs and services supported child protection, foster care, adoption, teen and young parent welfare, and family violence intervention and counselling. The division also consulted with child and family services agencies from eighteen First Nations on the provision of child welfare services to families living on reserve.

Corporate services supported program and service implementation within the department. They were comprised of: the Human Resources Division; Intergovernmental Relations Branch; Communications and Public Education Branch; Strategic Policy Branch; Research and Evaluation Branch; Information Technology Services Division; and Finance and Property Management Division.

The Department of Community Resources and Employment was disestablished on February 3, 2006. Career and employment services were assumed by the Department of Advanced Education and Employment, while responsibility for child care programs and licences was transferred to the Department of Learning. The Department of Community Resources assumed responsibility for income assistance, housing, child and family services, and community living programs and services.

Saskatchewan. Dept. of Continuing Education

  • GA 50
  • Primary Agency
  • 1972-1983

While The Department of Continuing Education Act was assented to on April 21, 1972, the first departmental annual report states that the department was created following the partial proclamation of the Act on July 1, 1972. The post-secondary and vocational training functions of the Department of Education were spun off as a separate department creating Continuing Education.

Gordon S. MacMurchy had been serving as Minister of Education prior to the split. The enabling legislation states that the Minister of Education would also serve as minister of the new department. Accordingly, MacMurchy continued to serve as both Minister of Education and minister of the new Department of Continuing Education to which he was officially appointed on April 21, 1972. He represented both departments until November 5, 1975. Ed Tchorzewski took over as minister of both departments at that time but a year later the portfolio for the Department of Continuing Education was given to Donald Faris.

The three major branches of the newly formed department were:
Colleges Branch which was responsible for community college and adult education development. This included operational coordination for the Saskatchewan Technical Institute (STI) in Moose Jaw and the Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Arts & Sciences (SIAAS) campuses in Regina and Saskatoon through the Saskatchewan Council of Institute Principals (SCIP). The principals reported directly to the Deputy Minister (DM) for most other purposes. These institutions later became the core of the Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science and Technology (SIAST). The department was responsible for providing a number of training programs such as the Vocational Rehabilitation for Disabled Persons (VRDP) program, a Federal-Provincial initiative that was administered jointly by several provincial government bodies.

Research and Evaluation Branch which was responsible for the investigation of program needs, program analysis, systems analysis and development requirements for operational and program planning considerations.

Administrative Services Branch which was responsible for the personnel, accounting and budgeting of the department and also provided services to the Department of Education under joint arrangement. The Student Assistance Section was also part of this branch.

The department was also responsible for administering the University Act which in 1972 meant the University of Saskatchewan. The Deputy Minister served on the Board of Governors, Senate and various planning and operations committees. The University of Regina gained independent status in 1974.

In the 1973-1974 fiscal year, the SCIP became the Saskatchewan Committee of Institute Principals.

In 1974-1975, Student Assistance moved to the Research and Evaluation Branch.

A more wide ranging re-organization took place in 1975-1976. Operations Division was created, encompassing the technical institutes, community colleges and vocational centres, as well as the Program Development Branch. An Occupational Training Division took responsibility for Canada Manpower training programs, non-registered Indian and Métis programs, the VRDP Program and registration of private trade schools. A separate branch of Student Services was created. Administrative Services and Research & Planning Branches continued to report directly to the DM. The universities reported through the Universities Commission.

Assistant Deputy Ministers appear on the 1976-1977 organizational charts, responsible for the two new divisions although the positions were likely created along with the divisions during the previous fiscal year.

In 1977-1978, Research and Planning Branch became Policy Planning and Management Information Systems Branch.

In the 1980-1981 fiscal year another major restructuring took place. The new organizational structure consisted of the following, all reporting through a single ADM to the DM: Office of Native Career Development; Policy and Program Division; Institutional Division; Administrative and Financial Services Division; Occupational Training Division; Student Services Branch.

A special project, the Prince Albert Institute Project team also reported to the Deputy Minister.

Gordon Gray Currie became the final minister of the department on May 8, 1982.

The Department of Advanced Education and Manpower Act was assented to on April 29, 1983, transforming the Department of Continuing Education into the Department of Advanced Education and Manpower.

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