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Notice d'autorité

Saskatchewan. Judicial District of Regina

  • GA 97
  • Primary Agency
  • 1907-1958

Judicial districts were geographical areas in Saskatchewan over which the courts held legal jurisdiction. Judicial boundaries pre-determined the centre where cases had to be heard. Criminal matters were usually heard in the judicial district where the crime occurred while civil matters were heard where the plaintiff or defendant resided or where the property in dispute was located.

The Judicial District of Regina was established in 1907. It was one of the original eight judicial districts established in 1907 as part of the reorganization of Saskatchewan's judicial system after becoming a province in 1905. The boundaries of the Regina District were altered several times during its existence, most notably in 1913, when its boundaries were considerably reduced. The Judicial District of Regina was located in the central part of the province. The centre of the district was located in the city of Regina. The courthouse was located at 2006 Victoria Avenue.

Towns and villages in the judicial district at some point during its existence were Abernethy; Balgonie; Bethune; Craik; Cupar; Davidson; Fillmore; Indian head; Lumsden; Milestone; Pense; Sedley and Strasbourg.

Courts holding jurisdiction in the judicial district included the Supreme Court; the Court of King's Bench; the Court of Queen's Bench; the District Court and the Surrogate Court. Both criminal and civil cases were heard in the judicial district. Criminal offences included arson; robbery; theft; murder; manslaughter; treason; kidnapping; assault; sexual assault; blackmail; extortion and perjury. Civil matters included divorce; contract disputes; foreclosures; the administration of estates of the deceased and probate of wills; small claims (debt) matters and property disputes.

A resident judge presided at the various court sittings. Court officials included a Clerk of the Supreme Court; a local registrar for the Court of King's Bench/Queen's Bench; a Clerk and Deputy Clerk of the District Court; a Clerk and Deputy Clerk of the Surrogate Court; a sheriff and deputy sheriff; court reports and process issuers (servers). Local registrars processed court documents; received documents for filing; kept accounting records and acted as clerks of the court at all courtroom and chamber sessions. Sheriffs executed court orders; served legal documents and enforced statute orders.

In 1958, all existing judicial districts were abolished and the province of Saskatchewan became one judicial district with twenty-one judicial centres. The Judicial District of Regina became the Judicial Centre of Regina.

Saskatchewan. Judicial District of Battleford

  • GA 93
  • Primary Agency
  • 1907-1958

Judicial districts were geographical areas in Saskatchewan over which the courts held legal jurisdiction. Judicial boundaries pre-determined the centre where cases had to be heard. Criminal matters were usually heard in the judicial district where the crime occurred while civil matters were heard where the plaintiff or defendant resided or where the property in dispute was located.

The Judicial District of Battleford was established in 1907. It was one of the original eight judicial districts established in 1907 as part of the reorganization of Saskatchewan's judicial system after becoming a province in 1905. The boundaries of the Battleford Judicial District were altered several times during its existence. The Judicial District of Battleford was located in the north-west part of the province. The centre of the district was located in the town of Battleford, on the Yellowhead Highway between Lloydminster and Saskatoon and across the North Saskatchewan River from the city of North Battleford. The courthouse was located at 291-23rd Street West.

Towns and villages in the judicial district at some point during its existence were Battleford; Beauval; Blaine Lake; Buffalo Narrows; Cut Knife; Edam; Hafford; Ile-A-La-Crosse; Lashburn; Lloydminster; Maidstone; Meadow Lake; Medstead; North Battleford; Paynton; Radisson; Spiritwood; St. Walburg and Turtleford.

Courts holding jurisdiction in the judicial district included the Supreme Court; the Court of King's Bench; the Court of Queen's Bench; the District Court and the Surrogate Court. Both criminal and civil cases were heard in the judicial district. Criminal offences included arson; robbery; theft; murder; manslaughter; treason; kidnapping; assault; sexual assault; blackmail; extortion and perjury. Civil matters included divorce; contract disputes; foreclosures; the administration of estates of the deceased and probate of wills; small claims (debt) matters and property disputes.

A resident judge presided at the various court sittings. Court officials included a Clerk of the Supreme Court; a local registrar for the Court of King's Bench/Queen's Bench; a Clerk and Deputy Clerk of the District Court; a Clerk and Deputy Clerk of the Surrogate Court; a sheriff and deputy sheriff; court reports and process issuers (servers). Local registrars processed court documents; received documents for filing; kept accounting records and acted as clerks of the court at all courtroom and chamber sessions. Sheriffs executed court orders; served legal documents and enforced statute orders.

In 1958, the province of Saskatchewan became one judicial district with twenty-one judicial centres. The Judicial District of Battleford became the Judicial Centre of Battleford.

Saskatchewan. Judicial District of Prince Albert

  • GA 96
  • Primary Agency
  • 1907-1958

Judicial districts were geographical areas in Saskatchewan over which the courts held legal jurisdiction. Judicial boundaries pre-determined the centre where cases had to be heard. Criminal matters were usually heard in the judicial district where the crime occurred while civil matters were heard where the plaintiff or defendant resided or where the property in dispute was located.

The Judicial District of Prince Albert was established in 1907. It was one of the original eight judicial districts established in 1907 as part of the reorganization of Saskatchewan's judicial system after becoming a province in 1905. The boundaries of the Prince Albert District were altered several times during its existence, most notably in 1920, when its boundaries were considerably reduced to accommodate the formation of the Judicial District of Melfort. The Judicial District of Prince Albert was located in the north central part of the province. The centre of the district was located in the city of Prince Albert, located on the banks of the North Saskatchewan River.

Towns and villages in the judicial district at some point during its existence were Birch Hills; Canwood; Duck Lake; Kinistino; Leask; Marcelin; Melfort; Rosthern; Shellbrook; Tisdale and Wakaw.

Courts holding jurisdiction in the judicial district included the Supreme Court; the Court of King's Bench; the Court of Queen's Bench; the District Court and the Surrogate Court. Both criminal and civil cases were heard in the judicial district. Criminal offences included arson; robbery; theft; murder; manslaughter; treason; kidnapping; assault; sexual assault; blackmail; extortion and perjury. Civil matters included divorce; contract disputes; foreclosures; the administration of estates of the deceased and probate of wills; small claims (debt) matters and property disputes.

A resident judge presided at the various court sittings. Court officials included a Clerk of the Supreme Court; a local registrar for the Court of King's Bench/Queen's Bench; a Clerk and Deputy Clerk of the District Court; a Clerk and Deputy Clerk of the Surrogate Court; a sheriff and deputy sheriff; court reports and process issuers (servers). Local registrars processed court documents; received documents for filing; kept accounting records and acted as clerks of the court at all courtroom and chamber sessions. Sheriffs executed court orders; served legal documents and enforced statute orders.

In 1958, all existing judicial districts were abolished and the province of Saskatchewan became one judicial district with twenty-one judicial centres. The Judicial District of Prince Albert became the Judicial Centre of Prince Albert.

Saskatchewan. Judicial District of Cannington

  • GA 98
  • Primary Agency
  • 1907-1922

Judicial districts were geographical areas in Saskatchewan over which the courts held legal jurisdiction. Judicial boundaries pre-determined the centre where cases had to be heard. Criminal matters were usually heard in the judicial district where the crime occurred while civil matters were heard where the plaintiff or defendant resided or where the property in dispute was located.

The Judicial District of Cannington was established in 1907. It was one of the original eight judicial districts established in 1907 as part of the reorganization of Saskatchewan's judicial system after becoming a province in 1905. The boundaries of the Cannington Judicial District were altered several times, most notably in 1913 when its boundaries were reduced to accommodate the establishment of the Judicial District of Estevan.

The Judicial District of Cannington was located in the south-east part of the province. The centre of the district was located in the town of Arcola, 60 kilometres north and 40 kilometres east of Estevan. The courthouse in Arcola was constructed around 1908.

Towns and villages located in the judicial district at some point during its existence were Alameda; Antler; Arcola; Bienfait; Carlyle; Carnduff; Creelman; Forget; Heward; Kisbey; Manor; Maryfield; Parkman; Redvers; Stoughton; Wawota and Wordsworth.

Courts holding jurisdiction in the judicial district included the Supreme Court; the Court of King's Bench; the District Court and the Surrogate Court. Both criminal and civil cases were heard in the judicial district. Criminal offences included arson; robbery; theft; murder; manslaughter; treason; kidnapping; assault; sexual assault; blackmail; extortion and perjury. Civil matters included divorce; contract disputes; foreclosures; the administration of estates of the deceased and probate of wills; small claims (debt) matters and property disputes.

A resident judge presided at the various court sittings. Court officials included a Clerk of the Supreme Court; a local registrar for the Court of King's Bench; a Clerk and Deputy Clerk of the District Court; a Clerk and Deputy Clerk of the Surrogate Court; a sheriff and deputy sheriff; court reports and process issuers (servers). Local registrars processed court documents; received documents for filing; kept accounting records and acted as clerks of the court at all courtroom and chamber sessions. Sheriffs executed court orders; served legal documents and enforced statute orders.

In 1922, the Judicial District of Cannington became the Judicial District of Arcola.

Zeman, Joseph, 1914-2009

  • PA 18
  • Individual
  • 1914-2009

Joseph (Joe) Zeman was born on February 6, 1914 near Outlook, Saskatchewan to Joseph and Sophie (Voytilla) Zeman. He had two siblings: Frank and Alice. Zeman graduated from Kenaston High School in 1932 and attended Outlook College. He attended Saskatoon Normal School from 1933 to 1934 and earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Agriculture (1944) and a Bachelor of Education degree (1969) from the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon.

Zeman worked as an agricultural economist for the federal Department of Agriculture, Economics Division in Saskatoon from 1944 until his retirement in 1967. He then worked as a teacher part-time until 1976.

Zeman was involved with numerous sport and recreation organizations at local, provincial and national level during his lifetime. He served those organizations as a coach, manager, administrator and executive member and was a founding member of the Saskatoon Minor Hockey Association; the Saskatchewan Minor Baseball Association and the Saskatchewan Junior Baseball Association. Zeman served as a director for numerous organizations, including the Saskatchewan Baseball Association (1978-1980); the Saskatchewan Amateur Hockey Association (1964-1975); the Saskatoon Parks and Recreation Board; Sask Sport (1973-1975, 1977-1980); the Saskatchewan Parks and Recreation Association (1977-1980) and the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame (1973-1980). Zeman coached and managed numerous baseball and hockey teams, including the Canadian baseball team that participated in the 1967 Pan-Am Games in Winnipeg, Manitoba.

Zeman's hobbies and interests centered around genealogy and history. Zeman conducted research for the 1983 book "Hockey Heritage: 88 Years of Puck-chasing in Saskatchewan", written by his daughter, Brenda Zeman. He also worked on a history of the Slovak people in Saskatchewan with his daughter in the mid 1980s.

Zeman was the recipient of many honours and awards, including the Saskatoon Kiwanis Distinguished Service Award (1961); the Saskatoon Kinsmen Sportsman of the Year Award (1964); and the Award of Merit from the Canadian Parks and Recreation Association (1980). He was inducted into the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame (1982); the Saskatoon Sports Hall of Fame (1986); and the University of Saskatchewan Huskie Athletics Wall of Fame (1986). Zeman was named an honorary life member in numerous organizations, including the Saskatchewan Agricultural Graduates Association; the Saskatchewan Baseball Association; the Saskatchewan Amateur Hockey Association; and the Saskatchewan Parks and Recreation Association. Zeman Court and Zeman Crescent in Saskatoon were named in his honour.

Zeman married Jessie Mary Shewan on October 24, 1941. They had five children: Gary; Dale; Brenda; Kevan and John Allan (died in infancy). Jessie Zeman died on November 17, 2001.

Joseph Zeman died in Saskatoon on July 2, 2009.

Bjorkdale (Sask.), 1968-

  • LGA 50
  • Local Government
  • 1968-

Bjorkdale is an urban municipality which was founded as a town in 1928 and later incorporated as a village on April 1, 1968. Bjorkdale is an agricultural based community in the eastern central part of Saskatchewan, approximately 170 kilometres south east of Prince Albert, Saskatchewan. It is located on NE 14-43-12 in the Rural Municipality of Bjorkdale No. 426.

The town of Bjorkdale was named for Charles Bjork, of Sweden, who settled two miles east of the present townsite in 1904.

The village is governed by an elected council that can hire staff to manage daily administration and maintain municipal services, such as roads, utilities and recreation facilities. The responsibilities of the council include enforcing bylaws; waste collection/landfill; fire protection; maintaining public utilities, roads and streets; issuing tax and assessment notices and collecting taxes and other fees.

The village currently (2009) has a population of 201 and is administered by a mayor, two councilors and an administrator.

Wolseley School Division No. 25, 1979-1993

  • LGA 56
  • Local Government
  • 1979-1993

The Wolseley Consolidated School District No. 25 of Saskatchewan became the Wolseley School Division No. 25 of Saskatchewan effective January 1, 1979, pursuant to the Education Act (S.S. 1978, c.17). The Division was based around Wolseley, Saskatchewan. The Board of the school division was responsible for administering the public elementary and secondary schools within its borders. The five member Board was elected through public vote. Funding to administer and operate the schools in the Division was provided through provincial grants and locally-generated revenue. The Division was located within the Qu'Appelle Valley Superintendency No. 27.

The responsibilities of the Board were the same as those assigned to the separate and francophone school boards in the province. The Board's duties and powers included administering and managing the educational affairs of the school division; exercising general supervision and control over the schools in the division; approving administrative procedures pertaining to the internal organization, management and supervision of the schools; providing and maintaining school accommodation, equipment and facilities; and appointing and employing qualified teachers, principals and other necessary staff.

In the fall of 1992, the Department of Education created the Scenic Valley School Division. Wolseley School Division No. 25 became part of Scenic Valley School Division No. 117 effective January 1, 1993.

Wilson Brothers Financial & Insurance Agents, 1912-1963

  • PA 70
  • Corporate
  • 1912-1963

Wilson Brothers Financial & Insurance Agents was established in Limerick, Saskatchewan in 1912. It was operated by Charles and John Thomas (Tom) Wilson, brothers who emigrated from County Wicklow, Ireland to Canada in 1905 and 1907, respectively. Prior to moving to Limerick, the brothers held homesteads in the Dana district at SE and SW 22-38-26 W2.

The business originated with Charles Wilson establishing a real estate and insurance office along with a collection agency for the M. Rumley Company, a manufacturer of farm machinery. Tom Wilson moved to Limerick in 1913 and Charles and Tom established Wilson Brothers Financial & Insurance Agents. The business offered insurance surety bonds and real estate loans for area residents. In 1915, Charles Wilson was also appointed as General Agent for the Victoria Trust and Savings Company, with the Wilson Brothers business managing its accounts. Tom Wilson served in the First World War from 1916 to 1918. In 1921, he sold his interest in the business to Charles Wilson and moved to Saskatoon. He continued as an agent for the Canada Life Insurance Company and operated a pig farm in the Pleasantvale district. Tom Wilson moved to Vancouver in the 1950s where he died.

Along with continuing to operate the Wilson Brothers business, Charles Wilson was also appointed in 1922 as Provincial Manager for the Victoria Trust and Savings Company (later the Victoria and Grey Trust Company). He managed the company's accounts throughout Saskatchewan. From 1936 to 1943, Charles Wilson was appointed as the Farmers' Representative on the Board of Review for the federal Farmers' Creditors Arrangement Act, 1934. In his absence during this period, the Wilson Brothers business was run by his son Kevin (1936 to 1941) and later J.H. Grundy (1941 to 1943.)

Wilson Brothers Financial & Insurance Agents remained in operation until December 31, 1963 upon the retirement of Charles Wilson. Wilson sold the business to George Darrah, who established Darrah Agencies. Charles Wilson died in Limerick on April 14, 1970.

Balcarres School Division No. 87, 1979-1993

  • LGA 57
  • Local Government
  • 1979-1993

The Balcarres Consolidated School District No. 87 of Saskatchewan became the Balcarres School Division No. 87 of Saskatchewan effective January 1, 1979, pursuant to the Education Act (S.S. 1978, c.17) to administrate schools in the Balcarres area. The Board of the school division was responsible for administering the public elementary and secondary schools within its borders. The eight member Board was elected through a public vote. Funding to administer and operate the schools in the Division was provided through provincial grants and locally-generated revenue. The Division was located within the Qu'Appelle Valley Superintendency No. 27.

The responsibilities of the Board were the same as those assigned to the separate and francophone school boards in the province. The Board's duties and powers included administering and managing the educational affairs of the school division; exercising general supervision and control over the schools in the division; approving administrative procedures pertaining to the internal organization, management and supervision of the schools; providing and maintaining school accommodation, equipment and facilities; and appointing and employing qualified teachers, principals and other necessary staff.

In the fall of 1992, the Department of Education created the Scenic Valley School Division. Balcarres School Division No. 87 became part of Scenic Valley School Division No. 117 effective January 1, 1993.

Swenson, Richard James, 1952-

  • PA 239
  • Individual
  • 1952-

Richard James (Rick) Swenson was born on April 12, 1952 in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan to Donald and Dorothy Swenson. He was raised in the Baildon district, southeast of Moose Jaw. Swenson attended the University of Saskatchewan and the University of Regina and studied Political Science and History.

Prior to entering politics, Swenson farmed in the Baildon district. He established Wheaton Bee Farms in 1976 which specialized in alfalfa seed production and dryland grass varieties. He was also active in the formation of the Baildon/Moose Jaw Effluent Irrigation Project from 1974 to 1982. Swenson was a member of the Canadian and Saskatchewan Seed Growers' Associations, the South Saskatchewan Wildlife Federation and the Saskatchewan Wheat Pool.

Swenson was first elected to the Saskatchewan Legislature in a 1985 by-election and served as the Progressive Conservative Party Member of the Legislative Assembly (MLA) for the Thunder Creek constituency until 1995. He served in the Grant Devine Government as Minister of Energy and Mines (1989-1991); and Minister of Indian and Métis Affairs (June to November 1991). Swenson's ministerial responsibilities included Saskatchewan Economic Development Corporation (1989-1991); Saskatchewan Research Council (1989-1991); Saskatchewan Mining Development Corporation (1990-1991); and Agricultural Development Corporation (1990-1991).

Swenson served as Acting Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Saskatchewan from 1992 to 1994 and was Leader of the Opposition from 1993 to 1994. He retired from politics in 1995. However, in 2004, he was elected Party Leader by the executive committee of the Progressive Conservative Party of Saskatchewan. Swenson ran unsuccessfully as the Progressive Conservative Party candidate for the Thunder Creek constituency in the 2007 general election. He continues (2009) to serve as Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Saskatchewan.

Swenson continues to farm in the Baildon district. He was named Farmer of the Year in 2003 by the Moose Jaw Exhibition Company. He has served on boards of directors of various agricultural and environmental initiatives and organizations. Swenson has also operated R.J. Swenson & Associates, a consulting and advertising firm, since 1997.

Rick Swenson has two sons: Andrew and Eric. He is married to Joanne Swenson.

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