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Haultain, Frederick, Sir, 1857-1942

  • Test1
  • Persona
  • 1857-1942

Frederick William Gordon Haultain was born on November 25, 1857 in Woolwich, England to Lieutenant-Colonel F.W. and Lucinde Helen (Gordon) Haultain. The family emigrated to Canada in 1860 and settled in Peterborough, Ontario (tehn Upper Canada) area. Educated in Montreal and the Collegiate Institute at Peterboro, Haultain earned a Bachelor of Arts (First Class Honours in the Classics) from the University of Toronto in 1879 and proceeded to study law at osgoode Hall. After articling with the Toronto firm of Bethune, Moss, and Falconbridge, he was called to the Ontario bar in 1882 and the North-West Terriorities Bar in 1884. IHe practiced law in Toronto and Kingston until August 1884. He moved west and established a new law practice in Fort MacLeod, North-West Territories (now Alberta) where he became a well known as a prosecutor and occassional editor of the Fort Macleod and Lethbridge newspapers.Federick William Gordon Haultain was born on November 25, 1857 in Woolwich, England to Lieutenant Colonel F.W. and Lucinde Helen (Gordon) Haultain. Educated in Montreal and the Collegiate Institute at Peterboro, Haultain earned a Bachelor of Arts (Classics) from the University of Toronto in 1879. and was called to the bar of Ontario in 1882. In August 1884, he moved west and established a law practice in Fort MacLeod, North-West Territories (now Alberta).

In September 1887, Haultain was elected to the Northwest Council as a representative for the district of MacLeod; when the Council became the Legislature in 1888, he was elected representative for the division of MacLeod, a position he would occupy until the formation of the provinces of Saskatchewan and Alberta (1888-1905). Within the Territorial administration, he was a member and chair of the executive committee from December 1891 to October 1897, wherupon he was called to form the first Executive Council. As a member of the Executive Council, Haultain served as Premier (1897-1905), President of the Executive Council (1897-1905), Attorney General (1897-1905), Terriorial treasurer (1897-1899, 1903-1905), Commissioner of Public Instruction (1897-1901) and Commissioner of Education (1901-1905). Upon the formation of the province of Saskatchewan, Haultain was elected in the riding of South Qu'Appelle as a member of the Legislative Assembly (1905-1912) where he served as Leader of the Official Opposition (1906-1912) for the Provincial Rights Party. In September 1887, Haultain was elected to the Northwest Council as a representative for the district of MacLeod; when the Council became the Legislature in 1888, he was elected representative for the division of MacLeod, a position he would occupy until the formation of the provinces of Saskatchewan and Alberta (1888-1905). Within the Territorial administration, he was a member and chair of the executive committee from December 1891 to October 1897, whereupon he was called to form the first Executive Council. As a member of the Executive Council, Haultain served as Premier (1897-1905), President of the Executive Council (1897-1905), Attorney General (1897-1905), Territorial treasurer (1897-1899, 1903-1905), Commissioner of Public Instruction (1897-1901) and Commissioner of Education (1901-1905). Upon the formation of the province of Saskatchewan, Haultain was elected in the riding of South Qu'Appelle as a member of the Legislative Assembly (1905-1912) where he served as Leader of the Official Opposition (1906-1912) for the Provincial Rights Party.

Haultain retired from Legislature upon his appointment as Chief Justice of the Superior Court of Saskatchewan on October 29, 1912. In 1918, Haultain was appointed Chief Justice of the Saskatchewan Court of Appeall. He retired in 1938. He was elected a member of the senate of the University of Saskatchewan in .1908 serving until 1917, whereupon he became Chancellor of the University (1917-1940). Haultain retired from Saskatchewan Legislature upon his appointment as Chief Justice of the Superior Court of Saskatchewan on October 29, 1912. In 1918, Haultain was appointed Chief Justice of the Saskatchewan Court of Appeal. He retired in 1938. He was elected a member of the senate of the University of Saskatchewan in .1908 serving until 1917, whereupon he became Chancellor of the University (1917-1940).

Apppointed King's Counsel by the Canadian government in 1902 and by the provincial government in 1907.Knighed in 1916 by King George V. received hourary Doctor of Laws degrees (LL.D.) from the University of Toronto (1915) and the University of Saskatchewan (1939).1902 represetned the North-West Terriories at the conornoation of King Edward VII. As a tribute to his contributions to education as Premier, Halutain Memorial School in Calgary was named in his honopur in 1980, asw ell as a mountain in Jasper National Park and a government buidling in Edmonton is named in his memory.was made an honourary chief ("White Star") by the Saskatchewan Cree Indians. Frederick W.A.G. Haultain was Commissioned Officer in the 57th Rifel Regiment of Peterborough, Ontario; Vice-President of the Canadian Bar Association (1896), Vice-President of the Liberal-Conservative Association (1898-1899),; Hourary President of the Territorial conservative Association (1903) Appointed King's Counsel by the Canadian government in 1902 and by the provincial government in 1907.Knighed in 1916. received honourary LL.D. from the University of Toronto (1915).1902 represented the North-West Territories at the coronation of King Edward VII. Haultain Memorial School in Calgary was named in his honour in 1980.

In March 1906, Haultain married Marion St. Clair Mackintosh (ca. 1875-1938) when she secured a divorce from her husband Louis Castellain. Marion died in Guelfph, Ontario in 1938. Haultain then married Louisa Ward Gilmour pf Montreal in September 1938. Haultain died in Montreal, Quebec on January 30, 1942. On October 23, 1943, his ashes were interned near the University of Saskatchewan Memorial Gates. In March 1906, Haultain married the daughter of former North-West Terirories' Lieutenant Governor Charles Herbert Mackintosh, Marion St. Clair (ca. 1875-1938). The marriage took place after she had secured a divorce from her husband Louis Castellain. Castellain was in fact a former client of Haultain's during his brief law partnership with Hugh Amos Robson between 1896 an 1898. Mrion died in Guelph, Ontario in 1938. Haultain then married Louisa Ward Gilmour pf Montreal in September 1938. Haultain died in Montreal, Quebec on January 30, 1942.

Initially married to Louis Castellain, a regina wine and cgar merchangTogether they had one child a daughter. She travelled to England following the wdding and refused to move to Regina, insdtead th returened to Otnario in 1909.

Strang, Peter

  • SCAA-UCCS-0195
  • Persona
  • 1856–1934

Boy Scouts of Canada, Saskatchewan Provincial Council

  • SCAA-PAS-F75
  • Entidad colectiva
  • 1915- present

Scouting began in Saskatchewan informally in 1908 and formally in 1915. In the early years, Saskatchewan scouts operated within a regional framework, with three or four regions in the province. In 1958 the administrative structure changed to a council based system, which continues to provide the framework for operations of the organization today (2009).

Co-operative Union of Saskatchewan

  • SCAA-PAS-F72
  • Entidad colectiva
  • 1944-2003

The Co-operative Union of Saskatchewan (CUS) began in 1940-1941 as the Saskatchewan Section of the Co-operative Union of Canada (CUC). The Saskatchewan Section incorporated on May 15, 1944 as the Co-operative Union of Saskatchewan under the Saskatchewan Co-operative Associations Act (SS 1944 s 47). The founding members were the Moosomin Co-operative Association Limited; the Sherwood Co-operative Association Limited; the Bulyea Community Co-operative Association Limited; the Moose Jaw Consumers' Co-operative Association Limited; and the Ukrainian Co-operative Association Limited, with McD. Rankin serving as first president and E.F. Scharf as secretary.

Membership in the CUS was open to any co-operative association incorporated within Canadian legislation; any federation of credit unions; and any mutual society with powers similar to that of a co-operative association or a credit union. This included consumer, producer, financial, insurance, service and educational co-operatives and credit unions.

The CUS was administered by a board of directors elected from the membership at the annual meeting; by executive officers selected by the board of directors; and by office staff whose services could be made available to the membership. The CUS executive included a President, Vice-President, Executive Secretary, and Public Relationship Officer. Until 1945, the CUS operated with part-time staff, but increased membership and demand for expanded services resulted in permanent staff. As membership grew, district federations were established across the province to better represent local interests and handle issues that could be resolved without the involvement of the CUS central governance. In 1960, the CUS was re-organized on a district basis, with the composition of the Board of Directors adjusted to include a representative from each federation or district and a few seats allocated for additional membership representatives.

The central purpose of the CUS was to encourage the education, development and maintenance of co-operatives in Saskatchewan. To achieve this objective the CUS conducted activities such as organizing, promoting and assisting co-op schools; promoting and advocating co-operative principles through local and province-wide meetings and talks by leaders in the co-operative movement; providing organizational, financial and legal advisory services to existing and developing co-operatives; printing, publishing, purchasing and making available materials supporting co-operative principles and practices; monitoring, preparing briefs and lobbying in response to legislation and regulations.

In 1955, following the amalgamation of the co-operative wholesales of Manitoba and Saskatchewan, a meeting was held with the boards of the International Co-operative Institute and the Co-operative Union of Saskatchewan; representatives of the Saskatchewan Department of Education and Department of Co-operation and Co-operative Development; the University of Saskatchewan and regional co-operatives, to discuss the need for organized education and training programs. At this meeting, the International Co-operative Institute changed its name to the Co-operative Institute and the Co-operative Union of Saskatchewan assumed directional responsibility for the Institute. Classes at the Institute began by October 1955. By 1959 its expanded program led the Co-operative Institute to incorporate and change its name to the Western Co-operative College.

In addition to the establishment of the College, the CUS continued its own education programs, providing guidance and supervisory assistance in local areas. Training sessions were co-sponsored with partners such as the Extension Department of the University of Saskatchewan, the provincial Department of Co-operation and Co-operative Development and the Saskatchewan Women's Co-operative Guild.

In August 1966, the Co-operative Union of Saskatchewan became known as the Co-operative Development Association (CDA). The emphasis for the organization changed from the education of co-operatives to the promotion of co-operative ideals and principles as well as the provision of leadership for the planning and development of co-operatives. The CDA was organized into sixteen districts each responsible for reviewing local co-operative development; for establishing district development programs; for coordinating education and for extension programs for members and non-members; and for developing and reviewing resolutions. Each district had a District Development Council and elected six delegates to the CDA. From these delegates, every two districts elected one Board of Director member. The Executive Committee (consisting of a president, two vice-presidents, and two additional members) was chosen by the Board.

In 1973-1974, the Co-operative Development Association was brought under the control of the Co-operative College of Canada. The College retained educational programming and promotion of co-operative development in Saskatchewan. In 1987, the Co-operative College of Canada merged with the Co-operative Union of Canada (CUC) and formed the Canadian Co-operative Association (CCA).

In 2003, the CCA, Saskatchewan Region was incorporated as its own community service co-operative under the name of Saskatchewan Co-operative Association (SCA). The SCA currently (2009) operates as a provincial coalition of co-operatives and credit unions responsible for the support of co-operative development and for the promotion of the co-operative model as a means of community economic development.

Agnew, Arnold LePage

  • SCAA-PAS-F574
  • Persona
  • 1891-1982

Arnold LePage Agnew was born on January 8, 1891 in Prince Albert, North-West Territories (later known as Saskatchewan) to Thomas James and Ida Mary (Hyslop) Agnew. He worked in the real estate and insurance industry in Prince Albert until his retirement in 1960.
Active in the Prince Albert community, Agnew was a member of the choir of the Cathedral Church of St. Alban the Martyr and served as a lay delegate to the General Synod of the Anglican Church. He was also active in the Prince Albert Historical Society and Prince Albert Little Theatre. A Freemason, Agnew was a Past Master and Life Member of the Kinistino Lodge No. 1 A.F. and A.M. at Prince Albert and an affiliated Past Master of Shellbrook Lodge No. 171 G.R.S. A.F. and A.M.

Agnew died in Prince Albert on August 12, 1982.

Agnew and his wife, Kathleen Dewdney, had five children: Ivan; Daphne; Patricia; Thomas and Arnold.

Adams, Hugh David

  • SCAA-PAS-F519
  • Persona
  • 1889-1992

Hugh David Adams was born on March 4, 1889 in Beckenham, Kent, England to Charles and Emily Frances(Laurie) Adams. Educated in England, Adams left school at the age of fourteen and worked as an apprentice, clerk and farmer.
In 1911, Adams emigrated to Canada and settled in the Chaplin, Saskatchewan district. In 1914, he returned to England to enlist for service in World War 1 but was declined for health reasons. On May 11, 1916 Adams enlisted in the Canadian Forces, City of Regina 195th Battalion. He traveled overseas with the 195th Battalion to France and served as a stretcher bearer. In 1918 Adams was transferred to the Army Orchestra in Brussels, Belgium after Armistice. He was demobilized on August 27, 1919 in Quebec.

After the War, Adams resumed farming in the Chaplin district. He later worked in Shamrock, Saskatchewan as a postmaster, village secretary treasurer and implement agent. He also acted as a first aid station for the community. In November, 1945 Adams moved to Roberts Creek, British Columbia. He moved to Victoria, British Columbia in 1971 and resided there until his death on January 13, 1992.

Adams' interests included music, drawing, photography, gardening and letter writing.

Adams married Eva Mary Peck in 1919. After Eva Adams' death in 1969, Adams married Violet Goodfellow. Adams did not have any children.

Casavant School District No. 3127

  • SCAA-PAS-F518
  • Local Government
  • 1913-1973

In July 1913, a committee of ratepayers in the Vonda, Saskatchewan district petitioned the Department of Education for the formation of a school district. At a meeting held by the committee on August 11, 1913, 10 resident ratepayers voted in favor of the district; none was opposed. The trustees elected were Clotere Denis, Emile Casavant and W. Richard.

Casavant School District No. 3127 was officially established on September 22, 1913 in accordance with the provisions of the Schools Act. The responsibilities of the district board included selecting and acquiring a school site; contracting the building of the school; furnishing and maintaining the school and grounds, buildings and equipment; hiring qualified teachers; providing books, globes, maps and other supplies to students and teachers; administering grants; settling disputes and maintaining school records and accounts.

In December, 1913, the Board of Trustees borrowed $1800 to build and furnish a school house with a teachers' residence. The one room school house was located at NW 23-37-1-W3.

The duties and powers of the district board were revised when Casavant School District joined the Wakaw School Unit No. 48 in 1952. The rural school was closed in June, 1961. On September 1, 1961, Casavant School District was transferred to the Saskatoon (East) School Unit No. 41. Casavant and Dinelle's School District No. 1176 were consolidated to form the Casavant Central School Board, which administered a centralized school located in the hamlet of St. Denis.

On July 24, 1973, Casavant School District was disestablished and the lands from the Casavant district were consolidated with Vonda School District No. 1312 and Vonda Roman Catholic Separate School District No. 18.

Air Force Association of Canada No. 600 Wing

  • SCAA-PAS-F47
  • Entidad colectiva
  • 1949 - present

The Air Force Association of Canada was founded on 21 May 1948 to provide civilian community support to the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF), and to serve as a network for ex-airmen who had returned to civilian life. Branches or "wings" were formed in many cities across Canada. Initially, the association drew its membership from all ranks of the RCAF, and concentrated on military-based aviation initiatives. The association was re-organized in 1972 to include members of the civilian aviation community. Its activities focused on supporting aviation in Canada, preserving the traditions of the RCAF, working with air cadets, improving living conditions for servicemen, cooperating with other veterans associations, and promoting community-based service. Members have been active in other activities including the National Executive of the Association and the RCAF Benevolent Fund.

No. 600 (City of Regina) Wing received its charter on 5 January 1949. The Association's membership includes veterans of numerous squadrons such as No. 162 BR (Flying Boat) Squadron, which flew consolidated Cansos during the Second World War. As of July 1998, the Association had 103 members. The Association is closely affiliated with the 600 RCAF Veterans Association, which provides assistance to needy air force veterans and works to preserve air force history.

Canadian Cooperative Implements Limited, Regina

  • SCAA-PAS-F4
  • Entidad colectiva
  • 1940-1992

Canadian Co-operative Implements Ltd. was incorporated in September 1940 for the purpose of providing a viable alternative source of farm equipment to meet the needs of western Canadian farmers. The operating objectives of the Co-operative were to design and manufacture innovative farm machinery to meet the needs of western farmers, to research and develop new concepts in farm equipment that would reduce farm production costs and enhance agricultural profits, and to maintain a western Canadian retail marketing system consisting of Co-op Implements depots and independent dealers.

By 1941, there were 12,000 members. Near the end of the war, a factory was purchased in Winnipeg with assistance from the three prairie governments. In 1948, Co-op Implements was re-organized to include in its function the actual manufacturing of farm implements and a retail distribution organization with direct member involvement with depot locations throughout Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and Alberta.

The following is a summary of the significant events from the time the Company was established. In 1940 Co-op Implements was founded, initially with the intent to manufacture farm implements. In 1952 Co-op Implements began to establish its retail network of company owned and leased stores. In 1975 Co-op Implement's retail network reached a total of 68 stores. In 1985 Co-op Implements products lines, manufacturing rights, tooling, etc. were sold to Greenland N.V., the parent company of Vicon Inc. In 1987 Vicon Inc. entered into an investment and financing arrangement with Co-op Implements to provide the Company with financial backing.

The Cooperative ceased operation in the early 1990's, and was struck off the register on April 7, 1997. Regina Depot was one of seventeen stores in Saskatchewan when the business was offered for sale in 1991.

Canadian Authors Association, Saskatchewan Branch

  • SCAA-PAS-F 610
  • Entidad colectiva
  • [1924?]-[1974?]

Saskatchewan members of the Canadian Authors Association first congregated in Regina in the early 1920s and soon began to conduct themselves as a Branch, although official status was not immediately forthcoming. It was probably officially constituted when seven professional writers were recruited and in good standing with the national organization, as per the Canadian Authors Association regulations. A small group of prominent authors would meet on the fourth Saturday of each month at the Regina Public Library, and as of 1924, Austin Bothwell was serving as President and Irene Moore of The Leader, as Secretary-Treasurer. Under their leadership an illustrated book, Saskatchewan: Her Infinite Variety, was published in 1925.

The Saskatchewan Branch remained focused in Regina. An offshoot of the Regina group also developed in Moose Jaw, where the most distinguished novelist at the time was Ethel Kirk Grayson, although today Joseph Schull is more well-known.

Western representation on the national board of the Canadian Authors Association soon became an irritant. With the war effort taking precedence in the 1940s, members opted to become war correspondents, or served on the Writers War Committee, an initiative fostered by the Canadian Authors Association national branch. The Regina branch opted to disband in 1944. In the post-war years, Mary Weekes, an author of historical books and participant in the Writers War Committee, became instrumental in reviving and guiding the group.

The Canadian Authors Association, and its associated branches, are viewed as providing the base for new, stronger organizations to emerge in the 1970s, which were quickly staffed with experienced writers and administrators, and benefited from being more specialized in function. The Writers Union of Canada took on labour-related issues, and regional Writers' Guilds began to emerge as groups that embraced amateurs. In Saskatchewan, the new Saskatchewan Arts Board's interest and funding became closely tied into the fledgling Saskatchewan Writers' Guild. The Canadian Authors Association Regina Branch reportedly folded in the early 1970s. Correspondence in the fonds suggest that former members of the Branch continued to ally themselves informally as late as 1980.

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