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Hepworth, Lorne, 1947-

  • PA 255
  • Individual
  • 1947-

Lorne Henry Hepworth was born on December 20, 1947 in Assiniboia, Saskatchewan to Henry and Eileen Hepworth. He attended rural schools and high school in Assiniboia. Hepworth attended the University of Regina from 1965 to 1967 and earned a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree from the University of Saskatchewan in 1971.

Prior to his entry into politics, Hepworth worked as a veterinarian with Hepworth-Pulfer Veterinary Services in Weyburn, Saskatchewan. He was involved with the Saskatchewan and Canadian Veterinary Medical Associations, the Weyburn Chamber of Commerce and the Weyburn Agricultural Society. Hepworth also operated a family farm near Assiniboia.

Hepworth was first elected to the Saskatchewan Legislature in 1982 and served as a Progressive Conservative MLA for the Weyburn constituency until 1991. Hepworth served in the Grant Devine Government as Minister of Agriculture (1983-1985); Minister of Energy and Mines (1985-1986); Minister of Advanced Education and Manpower (1986-1987); Minister of Education (1986-1989); Minister of Public Participation (1989-1990); and Minister of Finance (1989-1991).

Hepworth's ministerial responsibilities included Saskatchewan Grain Car Corporation (1983-1985); Agricultural Credit Corporation of Saskatchewan (1983-1985); Saskatchewan Oil and Gas Corporation (1985-1986); Public Service Commission (1986-1989); Teacher's Superannuation Commission (1986-1989); Advanced Technical Training Centre of Saskatchewan Corporation (1986-1989); Provincial Library (1987); Saskatchewan Archives Board (1987); Treasury Board (1989-1991); Saskatchewan Property Management Corporation (1989-1990); Saskatchewan Pension Plan (1989-1991); Public Service Superannuation Board (1989-1991); Saskatchewan Development Fund (1989-1991); Municipal Financing Corporation (1989-1991); Crown Investments Corporation (1990); Future Corporation (1990-1991); and SaskEnergy (1991).

After losing his seat in the 1991 provincial general election to Ronald Joseph Wormsbecker (NDP), Hepworth became Vice-President of the Crop Protection Institute of Canada (1992-1993) and held executive positions with the Canadian Agra group of companies (1993-1997).

Hepworth currently (2006) resides in Toronto, Ontario, where he is President of CropLife Canada, a trade association that represents manufacturers, developers and distributors of pest control products and plant biotechnology (1997-2006).

Hepworth married Fern Presber on December 23, 1970. They have two children: Graeme and Alana.

Hoffer, Abram, 1917-2009

  • PA 261
  • Individual
  • 1917-2009

Abraham (Abram) Hoffer was born on a farm near Hoffer, Saskatchewan on November 11, 1917 to Israel and Clara (Schwartz) Hoffer. After graduating from the local high school in 1934, Hoffer attended the University of Saskatchewan, where he earned Bachelor and Master of Science in Agriculture degrees in 1938 and 1940 respectively. Hoffer was employed as a research cereal chemist for Purity Flour Mills in Winnipeg, Manitoba from 1940 to 1944. After completing his Doctor of Philosophy degree in biochemistry from the University of Minnesota in 1944, Hoffer then pursued a degree in medicine. He studied first at the University of Saskatchewan (1945-1947) and then transferred to the University of Toronto, where he obtained his Doctor of Medicine degree in 1949.

Hoffer completed an internship with City Hospital in Saskatoon and then relocated to Regina to join the Saskatchewan Department of Public Health in 1950 as Director of Psychiatric Research, a position he held until 1967. Hoffer and his colleagues, including his long time writing partner Dr. Humphry Osmond, undertook extensive research into schizophrenia. Hoffer and Osmond obtained a grant from the Rockefeller Foundation to develop their adrenochrome hypothesis, the first widely examined biochemical theory related to schizophrenia. They went on to investigate the therapeutic application of mega-doses of vitamin B-3 and ascorbic acid to schizophrenics. The conclusions to these studies became the basis for their innovative method of orthomolecular psychiatry and medicine.

Hoffer returned to Saskatoon in 1955 and assumed additional duties as Assistant (1955-1958) and Associate Professor of Psychiatry (Research) at the College of Medicine of the University of Saskatchewan. Hoffer and Osmond went on to co-develop diagnostic tests and psychedelic therapy for the treatment of schizophrenia. They also continued to study the use of supplements to lower cholesterol levels, particularly niacin. In pursuing their research, Hoffer and Osmond were the first psychiatrists in North America to conduct double-blind controlled tests, and later published papers about the defects and flaws of this method.

Hoffer was instrumental in the formation of the American Schizophrenia Association (ASA) in 1964, and in 1968 founded the Saskatchewan Schizophrenia Foundation, which changed its name to the Canadian Schizophrenia Foundation (CSF) in 1969 in order to reflect its national scope. Hoffer also developed and edited the Journal of Orthomolecular Medicine, which served as a publishing outlet for researchers, practitioners, and proponents of orthomolecular medicine.

A resistance to the orthomolecular approach pervaded the psychiatric establishment of the time, and Hoffer's publications were invariably controversial. Hoffer felt that his freedom to publish and discuss therapeutic trials using vitamins was being restricted by his two employers, the University of Saskatchewan and the Saskatchewan Department of Health. In response, Hoffer resigned from his positions and launched a private practice in Saskatoon in 1967.

Hoffer continued to serve on the board of the ASA until 1971, when he and several colleagues launched the Huxley Institute for Biosocial Research and integrated the ASA as a division. Hoffer served as the new Institute's president until 1984, and would remain active in its operation and work until it ceased to exist in 1993.

In 1976, Hoffer relocated and established a psychiatric practice in Victoria, British Columbia, which he operated until December 31, 2005, treating thousands of patients using orthomolecular medicine and psychiatry. In 2006, Hoffer and his long-time office manager, Francis Fuller, also opened a non-medical consulting business called the Orthomolecular Vitamin Information Centre Inc., with Hoffer serving as president and Fuller serving as chief executive officer.

In 2003, the Canadian Schizophrenia Foundation changed its name to the International Schizophrenia Foundation (ISF), with Hoffer again serving as the founding president. Hoffer also established the Senior Physicians Society of British Columbia in 1999 and served as president.

Along with his busy practice and his active involvement in many organizations, Hoffer published widely in medical journals and popular magazines. He authored, co-authored and contributed to nearly a dozen books about schizophrenia and orthomolecular medicine. Hoffer received many honours and awards for his work including the Dr. Rogers Prize for Excellence in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (2007). Hoffer died in Victoria on May 27, 2009.

Hoffer married Rose Beatrice Miller on February 14, 1942. The Hoffers had three children: William, Leonard John, and Miriam.

Lingenfelter, Dwain Matthew, 1949-

  • PA 210
  • Individual
  • 1949-

Dwain Matthew Lingenfelter was born on February 27, 1949 in Shaunavon, Saskatchewan to Robert and Mary (Harty) Lingenfelter. He attended the University of Saskatchewan, where he earned a Bachelor of Arts degree. Lingenfelter was a farmer and small businessman when he was first elected to the Saskatchewan Legislature in 1978. He served as the New Democratic Party Member of the Legislative Assembly (M.L.A.) for the Shaunavon (1978-1986) and Regina Elphinstone (1986-2000) constituencies.

Lingenfelter served in the Blakeney and Romanow Governments as Minister of Social Services (1980-1982); Minister of Economic Diversification and Trade (1991-1992); Minister of Economic Development (1992-1997); Deputy Premier (1995-2000); Minister of Economic and Co-operative Development (1997); Minister of Crown Investments Corporation (1997-1999); and Minister of Agriculture and Food (1999-2000).

Lingenfelter was also Minister Responsible for the following: Saskatchewan Economic Development Corporation (1991-1995); Saskatchewan Government Growth Fund Management Corporation (1991-1997); Souris Basin Development Authority (1991-1992); SaskEnergy (1991-1992); Saskatchewan Government Insurance (1991-1992); Saskatchewan Power Corporation (1991-1992); Saskatchewan Gaming Corporation (1994-1995); Saskatchewan Opportunities Corporation (1994-1997); Saskatchewan Tourism Authority (1994-1997); Agricultural Credit Corporation of Saskatchewan (1999-2000); Milk Control Board (1999-2000); Saskatchewan Beef Stabilization Board (1999-2000); Saskatchewan Crop Insurance Corporation (1999-2000); and Agricultural and Food Products Development and Marketing Council (1999-2000).

Lingenfelter served as Opposition House Leader from 1982 to 1986 and again from 1988 to 1991. He was also Opposition Critic on privatization and Saskatchewan Government Insurance. He was Government House Leader from 1991 to 1995.

Lingenfelter resigned from Cabinet on July 6, 2000 and vacated his seat in the Legislative Assembly on August 31, 2000. In September, 2000, he became vice-president of government relations at Canadian Occidental Petroleum (later Nexen Inc.) in Calgary, Alberta.

On October 20, 2008, Lingenfelter announced his candidacy for Leader of the Saskatchewan New Democratic Party. He won the leadership vote on June 6, 2009 and succeeded Lorne Calvert as Leader. As the New Democratic Party candidate, Lingenfelter won a by-election in the Regina Douglas Park constituency on September 21, 2009. He was sworn into the Legislative Assembly on October 19, 2009. He served as Leader of the Opposition and Opposition Agriculture Critic in the Saskatchewan Legislative Assembly until he was defeated in the 2011 general election. Upon his defeat, he resigned as Leader.

Lingenfelter is married to Rubiela Lingenfelter, with whom he has two children: Sahid and Hannah. He has two sons and a daughter (Matthew, Travis and Sacha) from a previous marriage.

Pettick, Joseph, 1924-2010

  • PA 285
  • Individual
  • 1924-2010

Joseph Pettick was born in Nyirparasnya, Hungary on October 8, 1924. His family immigrated to Kipling, Saskatchewan in 1927 and settled in Regina in 1929. Pettick completed his primary and secondary school education in Regina. During The Second World War, Pettick worked, from 1939 to 1942, as a machinist and tool designer for Regina Industries Ltd. in the manufacture of anti-tank guns. He enlisted in the Navy in 1942 and served as a stoker aboard the HMCS Stone Town engaged in convoy duty in the North Atlantic.

Pettick's architectural career began in 1946 as an apprentice with Portnall & Stock Architects. He was registered as an architect with the Saskatchewan Association of Architects in 1954 and started his own firm, Joseph Pettick Architect Ltd., that same year. In 1955, Pettick attended the School of Architecture at the University of Oklahoma, where he studied Aesthetic Design, City Planning, and Structural and Mechanical Engineering. In 1996, Pettick enlarged his business by forming P3 Architecture (Pettick Phillips Partners Architects Ltd.) in partnership with Colin Phillips.

As of 2005, Pettick had executed over 1000 commissions, either as sole practitioner or as a member of a partnership. His buildings define the skyline of Regina, the most recognizable being the SaskPower Building (1963), City Hall (1976), the SaskTel Building, and the Bank of Montreal (1981).

Pettick received special recognition for his accomplishments including a Massey Medal for Architecture (1961); election to the College of Fellows of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada (1967); the naming of the shelter and administrative premises of the Regina Humane Society “The Joseph Pettick Animal Shelter” (1983); the B.O.M.A. Award for Design for the Bank of Montreal provincial office building (1988); election to Life Membership, Saskatchewan Association of Architects (2002); an honourary Life Membership, Royal Architectural Institute of Canada (2004); an Honorary Life Member, Regina Construction Association (2005); an Honorary Doctor of Laws, University of Regina (2005); and the investiture into the Saskatchewan Order of Merit (2005).

Pettick sat on various boards and associations, both locally and nationally including: the Saskatchewan Association of Architects; the Regina Housing Authority; the Structural Advisory Group of the National Research Council; the Saskatchewan Construction Council; the Saskatchewan Design Council and the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada. His interest in societal issues produced numerous treatises and publications related to governmental reform, nuclear energy, and northern development.

Pettick died in Regina on September 12, 2010.